To better see all uses of the word
render
in
Bleak House
please enable javascript.

render
Used In
Bleak House
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

as in: rendered her unconscious Define
to make or cause to become
  • I was rendered motionless.

  • There are no more uses of "render" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • Her verbal attack rendered me speechless.
  • The disorder will eventually render her paralyzed.

  • Go to more samples

as in: rendered service or a verdict Define
to give or supply something
  • ...and no human creature could render her any aid.

  • There are no more uses of "render" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • We’re waiting for the jury to render a verdict.
  • I received an invoice for $100 for services rendered.

  • Go to more samples

unspecified meaning
  • Mr. Skimpole’s general position there would have rendered it so without the addition of what he presently said.
  • All the love and duty I could ever have rendered to him is transferred to you.

  • Show more
  • We have only, in the second place, to observe those little formalities which are rendered necessary by our time of life and our being under the guardianship of the court.
  • I may render the same tribute, I am sure, to Mr. Carstone.
  • "The airs the fellow gives himself!" said my informant, shaking her head at old Mr. Turveydrop with speechless indignation as he drew on his tight gloves, of course unconscious of the homage she was rendering.
  • For these reasons I thought it best to be as useful as I could, and to render what kind services I could to those immediately about me, and to try to let that circle of duty gradually and naturally expand itself.
  • They agreed in nothing but their perfect neatness, their display of the whitest linen, and their storing-up, wheresoever the existence of a drawer, small or large, rendered it possible, of quantities of rose-leaves and sweet lavender.
  • After rendering this general tribute to the port, Mr. Snagsby in his modesty coughs an apology behind his hand for drinking anything so precious.
  • And could you not take the same means of rendering a Conversation unnecessary?
  • Though his services were rendered quite gratuitously.

  • Show more again
  • I must take all this into account, and it combines to render a decision very difficult.
  • But they are my companions everywhere; and by these means they acquire that knowledge of the poor, and that capacity of doing charitable business in general—in short, that taste for the sort of thing—which will render them in after life a service to their neighbours and a satisfaction to themselves.
  • You served under Captain Hawdon at one time, and were his attendant in illness, and rendered him many little services, and were rather in his confidence, I am told.
  • I had seen Mr. Guppy bringing in papers and arranging them for Mr. Kenge; and he had seen me and made me a forlorn bow, which rendered me desirous to get out of the court.
  • My Lady’s maid is a Frenchwoman of two and thirty, from somewhere in the southern country about Avignon and Marseilles, a large-eyed brown woman with black hair who would be handsome but for a certain feline mouth and general uncomfortable tightness of face, rendering the jaws too eager and the skull too prominent.
  • It is true I have no longer to maintain a dear grandmother who died in her hundred and second year, but enough remains to render it indispensable that the mill should be always going.
  • The windows, heavily shaded by trees, admitted a subdued light that made the faces around me pale, and darkened the old brasses in the pavement and the time and damp-worn monuments, and rendered the sunshine in the little porch, where a monotonous ringer was working at the bell, inestimably bright.
  • They then report progress to the eminent Smallweed, waiting at the office in his tall hat for that purpose, and separate, Mr. Guppy explaining that he would terminate his little entertainment by standing treat at the play but that there are chords in the human mind which would render it a hollow mockery.
  • Mr. Chadband is attached to no particular denomination and is considered by his persecutors to have nothing so very remarkable to say on the greatest of subjects as to render his volunteering, on his own account, at all incumbent on his conscience; but he has his followers, and Mrs. Snagsby is of the number.
  • In our condition of life, we sometimes couple an intention with our—our fancies which renders them not altogether easy to throw off.
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn with his usual leisurely ease advances, renders his passing homage to my Lady, shakes Sir Leicester’s hand, and subsides into the chair proper to him when he has anything to communicate, on the opposite side of the Baronet’s little newspaper-table.
  • We found him engaged with a not very hopeful pupil—a stubborn little girl with a sulky forehead, a deep voice, and an inanimate, dissatisfied mama—whose case was certainly not rendered more hopeful by the confusion into which we threw her preceptor.
  • There are reasons now known to me, reasons in which you have no part, rendering it far better for you that you should not remain here.
  • In the rendering of those little services, and in the manner of their acceptance, the trooper has become installed as necessary to him.
  • The assistance that she rendered me, she rendered on my strongest assurance that it was for the dear one’s good.
  • The assistance that she rendered me, she rendered on my strongest assurance that it was for the dear one’s good.
  • With such help from Mr. Jarndyce as you who know him so well can imagine him to have rendered me, I have succeeded.
  • That I’ll do, and render an account of course.
  • "My friend Jobling will render me his assistance in the capacity of clerk and will live in the ’ouse," said Mr. Guppy.
  • I have no doubt that his desire to retrieve what he had lost was rendered the more intense by his grief for his young wife, and became like the madness of a gamester.
  • I was sitting at the window with my guardian on the following morning, and Ada was busy writing—of course to Richard—when Miss Jellyby was announced, and entered, leading the identical Peepy, whom she had made some endeavours to render presentable by wiping the dirt into corners of his face and hands and making his hair very wet and then violently frizzling it with her fingers.
  • The periodical visits of the trooper to these rooms, however, in the course of his patrolling is an assurance of protection and company both to mistress and maid, which renders them very acceptable in the small hours of the night.
  • The old girl never appears in walking trim, in any season of the year, without a grey cloth cloak, coarse and much worn but very clean, which is, undoubtedly, the identical garment rendered so interesting to Mr. Bagnet by having made its way home to Europe from another quarter of the globe in company with Mrs. Bagnet and an umbrella.
  • Whether he was a better tenant than one might have supposed, in consequence of his friend Somebody always paying his rent at last, or whether his inaptitude for business rendered it particularly difficult to turn him out, I don’t know; but he had occupied the same house some years.
  • I think it would be impossible to make an admission with more ill will and a worse grace than Mr. Smallweed displayed when he admitted this, rendering it perfectly evident that Mr. Bucket was the very last person he would have thought of taking into his confidence if he could by any possibility have kept him out of it.
  • Mr. Bagnet merely distinguishes that epoch in the musical instrument business by kissing the children with an extra smack before breakfast, smoking an additional pipe after dinner, and wondering towards evening what his poor old mother is thinking about it—a subject of infinite speculation, and rendered so by his mother having departed this life twenty years.
  • I am sorry that any local disputes of Sir Leicester’s—they are not of his seeking, however, I believe—should render it a matter of some absurd difficulty to show you any attention here."
  • "Nine years, my dear," he said after thinking for a little while, "have passed since I received a letter from a lady living in seclusion, written with a stern passion and power that rendered it unlike all other letters I have ever read.
  • By all that is base and despicable," cried Mr. Boythorn, "the treatment of surgeons aboard ship is such that I would submit the legs—both legs—of every member of the Admiralty Board to a compound fracture and render it a transportable offence in any qualified practitioner to set them if the system were not wholly changed in eight and forty hours!"
  • And if the time should come when I can stretch out a hand to render the least service to one whom it is better not to name even here, I will not fail to do it for her dear daughter’s sake."

  • There are no more uses of "render" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: rendered service or a verdict Define
to give or supply something
as in: rendered her unconscious Define
to make or cause to become
as in: rendered with, or rendered from Define
to portray or create something in a particular way; or to interpret, translate, or extract from (see word notes for more detailed definitions based on context)
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading