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Bleak House
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  • It was so delightful to know that she could confide in me and like me!
  • Sometimes I thought of confiding in Richard, but was deterred by the possibility of his fighting Mr. Guppy and giving him black eyes.
  • That I had much to learn, myself, before I could teach others, and that I could not confide in my good intentions alone.
  • They (and especially Richard) were naturally pleased, for similar reasons, and considered it no common privilege to be so freely confided in by such an attractive man.
  • I really was frightened at the thought of the importance I was attaining and the number of things that were being confided to me.
  • At last, whenever a new pupil came who was a little downcast and unhappy, she was so sure—indeed I don’t know why—to make a friend of me that all new-comers were confided to my care.
  • I am very fond of being confided in by children and am happy in being usually favoured in that respect, but on this occasion it gave me great uneasiness.
  • They brought a chair on either side of me, and put me between them, and really seemed to have fallen in love with me instead of one another, they were so confiding, and so trustful, and so fond of me.
  • You were to confide freely in me, and I will confide freely in you.
  • But they have known me much longer than you have, and the confiding eye of affection is not the distrustful eye of business.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII Jarndyce and Jarndyce If the secret I had to keep had been mine, I must have confided it to Ada before we had been long together.
  • You were to confide freely in me, and I will confide freely in you.
  • He remembered her by fits and starts, even with bursts of tears, and at such times would confide to me the heaviest selfreproaches.
  • I am so much attached to you that I may confide in you, my dear, as a third party wholly disinterested, that he is fickleness itself.
  • "Confide fully in him," she said after a little while.
  • He had left a note of welcome for me, as sunny as his own face, and had confided his bird to my care, which I knew to be his highest mark of confidence.
  • Confide in me, my child.
  • Secondly, though Mr. Jarndyce’s glance as he withdrew it rested for but a moment on me, I felt as if in that moment he confided to me— and knew that he confided to me and that I received the confidence —his hope that Ada and Richard might one day enter on a dearer relationship.
  • I had no right, I knew very well, to be uncomfortable because she confided in me, and I felt it was unreasonable; still, with all I could do, I could not quite help it.
  • Secondly, though Mr. Jarndyce’s glance as he withdrew it rested for but a moment on me, I felt as if in that moment he confided to me— and knew that he confided to me and that I received the confidence —his hope that Ada and Richard might one day enter on a dearer relationship.
  • She tapped me several times upon the arm and nodded good-humouredly as if she were anxious I should understand that I had no cause to fear her, though she spoke so gloomily, and confided these awful secrets to me.
  • It is a part of my professional duty to study and to understand a gentleman who confides his interests to me.
  • The months were gliding away, and my dear girl, sustained by the hopes she had confided in me, was the same beautiful star in the miserable corner.
  • For the mainspring of the story was that in spite of the man’s absorbing selfishness, his wife (overpowered by his deportment) had, to the last, believed in him and had, on her death-bed, in the most moving terms, confided him to their son as one who had an inextinguishable claim upon him and whom he could never regard with too much pride and deference.
  • But I confide in you.
  • Jo and his conductor presently return, and Jo is assisted to his mattress by the careful Phil, to whom, after due administration of medicine by his own hands, Allan confides all needful means and instructions.
  • When we were in our own room, and when she might perhaps have told me what I was so unprepared to hear, I gave her no encouragement to confide in me; I never thought she stood in need of it.
  • Dear, dear, to think how much time we passed alone together afterwards, and how often I repeated to the doll the story of my birthday and confided to her that I would try as hard as ever I could to repair the fault I had been born with (of which I confessedly felt guilty and yet innocent) and would strive as I grew up to be industrious, contented, and kind-hearted and to do some good to some one, and win some love to myself if I could.
  • Her tenderness for me was as loving and true as ever; I did not for a moment doubt that; but there was a quiet sorrow about her which she did not confide to me, and in which I traced some hidden regret.
  • I was born into this unfinished contention with all its chances and changes, and it began to unsettle me before I quite knew the difference between a suit at law and a suit of clothes; and it has gone on unsettling me ever since; and here I am now, conscious sometimes that I am but a worthless fellow to love my confiding cousin Ada.
  • I was not surprised by Caddy’s being in low spirits when we went downstairs, or by her sobbing afresh on my neck, or by her saying she would far rather have been scolded than treated with such indifference, or by her confiding to me that she was so poor in clothes that how she was ever to be married creditably she didn’t know.
  • When I had satisfied him on these points, he asked me particularly to consider—taking time to think—whether within my knowledge there was any one, no matter where, in whom she might be at all likely to confide under circumstances of the last necessity.
  • )—don’t be ashamed still to confide in me, for there will be nothing monstrous or uncommon in it.
  • Then, for heaven’s sake, having Harold Skimpole, a confiding child, petitioning you, the world, an agglomeration of practical people of business habits, to let him live and admire the human family, do it somehow or other, like good souls, and suffer him to ride his rocking-horse!"
  • I wish to represent myself to her through you, because she has a great esteem and respect for her cousin John; and I know you will soften the course I take, even though you disapprove of it; and— and in short," said Richard, who had been hesitating through these words, "I—I don’t like to represent myself in this litigious, contentious, doubting character to a confiding girl like Ada," I told him that he was more like himself in those latter words than in anything he had said yet.

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  • She confided in her parents.
  • She confided in me. I won’t repeat what was said.

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