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Bleak House
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Bleak House
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  • You know, just accustom yourself to talk it over, with your tact and in your quiet way, with him and Ada, and see what you all make of it.
  • No, don’t ring—I have been brought up in a sharp school and am accustomed to a variety of general practice.
  • Mr. Snagsby, as a timid man, is accustomed to cough with a variety of expressions, and so to save words.
  • Mr. Chadband, at last seeing his opportunity, makes his accustomed signal and rises with a smoking head, which he dabs with his pocket-handkerchief.
  • She should be an upper servant by her attire, yet in her air and step, though both are hurried and assumed—as far as she can assume in the muddy streets, which she treads with an unaccustomed foot—she is a lady.
  • I am accustomed to a fire, and I am an old man, and I soon chill.
  • The poor children scrambled up and tumbled down the house as they had always been accustomed to do.
  • "Yet, Charley," said I, looking round, "I miss something, surely, that I am accustomed to?"
  • Also, notwithstanding their martial appearance, broad square shoulders, and heavy tread, whether there are within the same limits two more simple and unaccustomed children in all the Smallweedy affairs of life.
  • A thoroughly vagabond dog, accustomed to low company and publichouses; a terrific dog to sheep, ready at a whistle to scamper over their backs and tear out mouthfuls of their wool; but an educated, improved, developed dog who has been taught his duties and knows how to discharge them.
  • No light is admitted into the darkened chamber, and people unaccustomed to it enter, and treading softly but heavily, carry a weight into the bedroom and lay it down.
  • He knows that by touching her with his skilful and accustomed hand he can soothe her yet more readily.
  • This woman, as he has of late been so accustomed to call her, looks out upon them.
  • It was only natural that I should not be quite accustomed to the loss of my darling yet.
  • I went back, not quite accustomed yet to the change, but all the better for that hovering about my darling.
  • I’m a soldier’s wife and accustomed to travel my own way.
  • "Being a prudent man and accustomed to take care of your own affairs, you begin to rummage among the papers as you have come into; don’t you?"
  • We are not accustomed to carry things with the same hand or to look at ’cause from the same point.
  • I am not much accustomed to correspondence myself, and I am particular respecting this present letter because I want it to be both straightforward and delicate.
  • Only one Mercury in powder gapes disconsolate at the hall-window; and he mentioned last night to another Mercury of his acquaintance, also accustomed to good society, that if that sort of thing was to last—which it couldn’t, for a man of his spirits couldn’t bear it, and a man of his figure couldn’t be expected to bear it—there would be no resource for him, upon his honour, but to cut his throat!
  • When they come to a certain spot before the mausoleum-door, Sir Leicester’s accustomed horse stops of his own accord, and Sir Leicester, pulling off his hat, is still for a few moments before they ride away.
  • He had often thought of our future, and foreseeing that the time must come, and fearing that it might come soon, when Ada (now very nearly of age) would leave us, and when our present mode of life must be broken up, had become accustomed to reflect on this proposal.
  • My Lady’s state has a hollow look, thus gloomy and abandoned; and in the inner apartment, where Mr. Bucket last night made his secret perquisition, the traces of her dresses and her ornaments, even the mirrors accustomed to reflect them when they were a portion of herself, have a desolate and vacant air.
  • But so long accustomed to suppress emotion and keep down reality, so long schooled for her own purposes in that destructive school which shuts up the natural feelings of the heart like flies in amber and spreads one uniform and dreary gloss over the good and bad, the feeling and the unfeeling, the sensible and the senseless, she had subdued even her wonder until now.
  • …and his hands lean and veinous, and his eyes green and watery; and, over and above this, as he continues, while he claws, to slide down in his chair and to collapse into a shapeless bundle, he becomes such a ghastly spectacle, even in the accustomed eyes of Judy, that that young virgin pounces at him with something more than the ardour of affection and so shakes him up and pats and pokes him in divers parts of his body, but particularly in that part which the science of self-defence…
  • I am so accustomed and inured to hard work that I don’t know what fatigue is."
  • Mr. Chadband, pausing with the resignation of a man accustomed to be persecuted and languidly folding up his chin into his fat smile, says, "Let us hear the maiden!
  • "My dear father," returned Prince, "we well know what little comforts you are accustomed to and have a right to, and it will always be our study and our pride to provide those before anything.
  • …connexion, sir," says Mr. Sladdery, the librarian, "or if you want to get this dwarf or giant into the houses of my high connexion, sir, or if you want to secure to this entertainment the patronage of my high connexion, sir, you must leave it, if you please, to me, for I have been accustomed to study the leaders of my high connexion, sir, and I may tell you without vanity that I can turn them round my finger"— in which Mr. Sladdery, who is an honest man, does not exaggerate at all.

  • There are no more uses of "accustomed" in the book.

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  • In the United States we’re accustomed to forming our own opinion about the promises of advertisements and politicians.
  • Actors and politicians are accustomed to less privacy than the rest of us.

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