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resolve
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Bleak House
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resolve
Used In
Bleak House
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  • But she had beauty, pride, ambition, insolent resolve, and sense enough to portion out a legion of fine ladies.
  • We agreed to say nothing to Mr. Jarndyce until we had spoken to Richard; and as he was coming next evening, we resolved to have a very serious talk with him.
  • It was necessary to count all the stitches in that work, and I resolved to go on with it until I couldn’t keep my eyes open, and then to go to bed.
  • I catch them in humane man traps, fire split peas at their legs, play upon them with the engine—resolve to free mankind from the insupportable burden of the existence of those lurking ruffians.
  • I cannot imagine a countenance and manner more singularly expressive of caution and indecision, and a perpetual impulse to do something he could not resolve to venture on, than Mr. Krook’s was that day.
  • I was resolved that they should not.
  • Then the greater right I have on my side when I resolve to do all I can to bring it to an end.
  • I resolved in my own mind in this little pause, by some means, to see Richard when I grew strong and try to set him right.
  • I was quite resolved to keep it, but I sat down for a little while first to reflect upon all my blessings.
  • Dear mother, are you so resolved?
  • But to wait and wait, and expect and expect, and think and think, was such bad preparation that I resolved to go along the road again and meet her.
  • I AM resolved.
  • Sir Leicester is perhaps not wholly without an impression, though he has never resolved it into words, that the angel of death in the discharge of his necessary duties may observe to the shades of the aristocracy, "My lords and gentlemen, I have the honour to present to you another Dedlock certified to have arrived per the family gout."
  • In his lowering magazine of dust, the universal article into which his papers and himself, and all his clients, and all things of earth, animate and inanimate, are resolving, Mr. Tulkinghorn sits at one of the open windows enjoying a bottle of old port.
  • But before I got to the second milestone, I had been in so many palpitations from seeing dust in the distance (though I knew it was not, and could not, be the coach yet) that I resolved to turn back and go home again.
  • Before night his doubt whether he may not be responsible for some inconceivable part in the catastrophe which is the talk of the whole neighbourhood is almost resolved into certainty by Mrs. Snagsby’s pertinacity in that fixed gaze.
  • I will not write this something in my thoughts until you have quite resolved within yourself that nothing can change me as you know me.
  • I therefore resolved, after much thinking of it, to make a private visit to Mr. Skimpole and try delicately to explain myself.
  • The mist and the sleet into which the snow has all resolved itself are darker, and the blaze begins to tell more vividly upon the room walls and furniture.
  • To strike at him on any of these occasions would be to fell and disable him, but the pursuer cannot resolve to do that, and so the grimly ridiculous pursuit continues.
  • He makes so many of these references to the law-stationer in the course of a day or two that Allan, after conferring with Mr. Jarndyce, good-naturedly resolves to call in Cook’s Court, the rather, as the cart seems to be breaking down.
  • Is he in a hardened or a softened mood, he still lays his injuries equally at that door; he was thwarted, in that quarter, of a set purpose, and that purpose could only originate in the one subject that is resolving his existence into itself; besides, it is a justification to him in his own eyes to have an embodied antagonist and oppressor.
  • Solitude under such circumstances being not to be thought of, Volumnia is attended by her maid, who, impressed from her own bed for that purpose, extremely cold, very sleepy, and generally an injured maid as condemned by circumstances to take office with a cousin, when she had resolved to be maid to nothing less than ten thousand a year, has not a sweet expression of countenance.
  • In the evening I was so much worse that I resolved to prepare Charley, with which view I said, "You’re getting quite strong, Charley, are you not?’
  • However, as Caddy’s illness had certainly interfered, more or less, with my home duties—though I had always been there in the morning to make my guardian’s breakfast, and he had a hundred times laughed and said there must be two little women, for his little woman was never missing—I resolved to be doubly diligent and gay.

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  • She resolved to never drink again.
  • She never waivered in her resolve to attend a good college.

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Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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