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Bleak House
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Bleak House
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as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
  • As I approached the house, I was strongly inclined to turn back,
  • For the rest he is a quiet lodger, full of handy shifts and devices as before mentioned, able to cook and clean for himself as well as to carpenter, and developing social inclinations after the shades of evening have fallen on the court.

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  • "You see, my precious girl," said Richard, passing her golden curls through and through his hand, "I was a little hasty perhaps; or I misunderstood my own inclinations perhaps.
  • He then rises and replies, "Sir Leicester and Lady Dedlock, allow me to thank you for your attention and only to observe that I shall very seriously recommend my son to conquer his present inclinations.

  • There are no more uses of "inclined" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • I’m inclined to believe him.
  • I was inclined to laugh, but overcame the urge.

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as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
  • ...inclined his head as if he did not wholly dispute even that.
  • In his lifetime, and likewise in the period of Snagsby’s "time" of seven long years, there dwelt with Peffer in the same lawstationering premises a niece—a short, shrewd niece, something too violently compressed about the waist, and with a sharp nose like a sharp autumn evening, inclining to be frosty towards the end.

  • There are no more uses of "incline" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • I climbed down the incline.
  • She inclined her head to indicate her agreement.

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unspecified meaning
  • We had talked it over very often now, and there was some talk of gratifying the inclination of his childhood for the sea.
  • The young man inclines his head in acknowledgment of the precepts of experience.

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  • For I was so little inclined to sleep myself that night that I sat up working.
  • "Perhaps it would be best, first of all," said I, "to ask Mr. Richard what he inclines to himself."
  • One observes my Lady, how recognisant of my Lord’s politeness, with an inclination of her gracious head and the concession of her so-genteel fingers!
  • The young man don’t seem inclined to keep his word, but—Oh!
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn, comprehending it, inclines his head and says he is much obliged.
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn re-asserts it by another inclination of his head.
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn inclines his head again.
  • "You have no inclination in Mr. Kenge’s way?" suggested Mr. Jarndyce.

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  • I told him that he addressed my interest or what he supposed to be my interest quite as unsuccessfully as he addressed my inclination, and he would now understand that I requested him, if he pleased, to go away immediately.
  • It was so tender in them to care so much for me, it was so gracious in that father who had not forgotten me to have made my orphan way so smooth and easy and to have inclined so many youthful natures towards me, that I could hardly bear it.
  • The majority incline to the debilitated cousin’s sentiment, which is in few words—"no business—Rouncewell’s fernal townsman."
  • This notification to all whom it may concern, he inserts in the letter-box, and then putting on the tall hat at the angle of inclination at which Mr. Guppy wears his, informs his patron that they may now make themselves scarce.
  • When Mr. Jarndyce advised him to try and decide within himself whether his old preference for the sea was an ordinary boyish inclination or a strong impulse, Richard answered, Well he really HAD tried very often, and he couldn’t make out.
  • He inclined his head to Richard and me and spoke to my guardian.
  • There is no need for you to part with the writing, against your inclination—though I should prefer to have it.
  • After each of these interrogatories, she has inclined her head.
  • Caddy, who had not seen me since her wedding-day, was so glad and so affectionate that I was half inclined to fear I should make her husband jealous.
  • He slightly inclines and advances his head as not quite understanding the question.
  • Sir Leicester, with a gracious inclination of his head, seems to say to himself, "A sensible woman this, on the whole, though occasionally precipitate."
  • "Why, I don’t know," Mr. George interposes, "that the young woman need give herself that trouble, for to tell you the truth, I am not inclined to smoke it to-day."
  • He seems to know that they have an inclination to shrink from him, partly for what he is and partly for what he has caused.
  • Clear of the room he looks at his watch but is inclined to doubt it by a minute or thereabouts.
  • He seems half inclined for another voyage.
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn inclines his head.
  • My guardian himself saw him before he was left for the night and reported to me when he returned to the growlery to write a letter on the boy’s behalf, which a messenger was charged to deliver at day-light in the morning, that he seemed easier and inclined to sleep.
  • He proposed to show us his Court of Chancery and all the strange medley it contained; during the whole of our inspection (prolonged by himself) he kept close to Mr. Jarndyce and sometimes detained him under one pretence or other until we had passed on, as if he were tormented by an inclination to enter upon some secret subject which he could not make up his mind to approach.
  • I was not surprised to observe Mr. Kenge inclined to dispute what he said before he had said much, for I knew that no two people ever did agree about anything in Jarndyce and Jarndyce.
  • Mr. Vholes, whose black dye was so deep from head to foot that it had quite steamed before the fire, diffusing a very unpleasant perfume, made a short one-sided inclination of his head from the neck and slowly shook it.
  • I further take the liberty to mention that if I could have supposed a certain unfortunate gentleman to have been in existence, I never could and never would have rested until I had discovered his retreat and shared my last farthing with him, as my duty and my inclination would have equally been.
  • The question then arises, should that young woman be deprived of these many advantages and that good fortune simply because she has"—Sir Leicester, with an apologetic but dignified inclination of his head towards the ironmaster, winds up his sentence—"has attracted the notice of Mr Rouncewell’s son?
  • "You foolish Caddy," returned Mrs. Jellyby, "do I look angry, or have I inclination to be angry, or time to be angry?
  • When I see you, my dear Miss Summerson, intent upon the perfect working of the whole little orderly system of which you are the centre, I feel inclined to say to myself—in fact I do say to myself very often— THAT’S responsibility!"
  • "I am inclined to think," returned my guardian, "that Miss Summerson has seen too much of the effects of the court and the cause to exert any influence in their favour.

  • There are no more uses of "inclined" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
Show Multiple Meanings
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