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Bleak House
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Bleak House
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  • Neither did I know the loftiness and haughtiness of Lady Dedlock’s face, at all, in any one.
  • She was a lady of a haughty temper.
  • There was something very winning in her haughty manner, and it became more familiar—I was going to say more easy, but that could hardly be—as she spoke to him over her shoulder.
  • The truth is, he wrote to me under a sort of protest while unable to write to you with any hope of an answer—wrote coldly, haughtily, distantly, resentfully.
  • Late in the afternoon, when she next appears upon the staircase, she is in her haughtiest and coldest state.
  • Beautiful, elegant, accomplished, and powerful in her little world (for the world of fashion does not stretch ALL the way from pole to pole), her influence in Sir Leicester’s house, however haughty and indifferent her manner, is greatly to improve it and refine it.
  • If you had ever seen her sister, you would know her to have been as resolute and haughty as she.
  • They say of her that she has lately grown more handsome and more haughty.
  • "Or a haughty gentleman of HIM?" cries mademoiselle, referring to Sir Leicester with ineffable disdain.
  • Something frozen and fixed is upon his manner, over and above its usual shell of haughtiness, and Mr. Bucket soon detects an unusual slowness in his speech, with now and then a curious trouble in beginning, which occasions him to utter inarticulate sounds.
  • Not so much by her hurried gesture of entreaty, not so much by her quick advance and outstretched hands, not so much by the great change in her manner and the absence of her haughty self-restraint, as by a something in her face that I had pined for and dreamed of when I was a little child, something I had never seen in any face, something I had never seen in hers before.
  • …where he lived and unless he entered into, and fulfilled, an undertaking to appear in Cook’s Court to-morrow night, "to—mor—row—night," Mrs. Snagsby repeats for mere emphasis with another tight smile and another tight shake of her head; and to-morrow night that boy will be here, and to-morrow night Mrs. Snagsby will have her eye upon him and upon some one else; and oh, you may walk a long while in your secret ways (says Mrs. Snagsby with haughtiness and scorn), but you can’t blind ME!
  • He afterwards did conjecture (but it was mere conjecture) that some injury which her haughty spirit had received in her cause of quarrel with her sister had wounded her beyond all reason, but she wrote him that from the date of that letter she died to him—as in literal truth she did—and that the resolution was exacted from her by her knowledge of his proud temper and his strained sense of honour, which were both her nature too.

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  • It is a story about a haughty princess who has a great fall.
  • She has that haughty, rich and entitled attitude.

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