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earnest
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Bleak House
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earnest
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Bleak House
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  • He looked unprepared for my being so earnest, and even a little alarmed.
  • But Mr. Jobling declares with much earnestness that he "can’t stand it."
  • It seems very strange, as there must be right somewhere, that an honest judge in real earnest has not been able to find out through all these years where it is.
  • A word in earnest is as good as a speech.
  • I put up my trembling little hand to clasp hers or to beg her pardon with what earnestness I might, but withdrew it as she looked at me, and laid it on my fluttering heart.
  • Richard with his head bent, and her hand drawn through his arm, was talking to her very earnestly; and she looked up in his face, listening, and seemed to see nothing else.
  • I have thought of that several times and have been quite angry with myself for meaning to be so much in earnest and—somehow—not exactly being so.
  • For all his waywardness, he took great credit to himself as being determined to be in earnest "this time."
  • "But this is taking a good deal of trouble," said Mr. Skimpole in his light way, "when you are not in earnest after all."
  • "Not in earnest!" returned Mr. Boythorn with unspeakable warmth.
  • I am that much in earnest.
  • Consider how important it is to you both, and what a point of honour it is towards your cousin, that you, Richard, should be quite in earnest without any reservation.
  • Not in earnest!
  • I now affectionately advise, I now most earnestly entreat, you two to part as you came here.
  • They shook hands earnestly, and my guardian said some words of comfort to him.
  • There is something very touching in the earnestness of the old lady’s voice and in the tremble that goes through her quaint old figure.
  • He came up to me in the hall, took both my hands, pressed them earnestly, and opened his mouth twice.
  • In case this should be so, or in case you should entertain much thought of me in what you are doing, I most earnestly entreat and beg you to desist.
  • She was so singularly earnest that I drew back, almost afraid of her.
  • She’s that earnest," says Mr. Bagnet, "and true to her colours—that, touch us with a finger—and she turns out—and stands to her arms.
  • My guardian had throughout been earnest to visit me, and there was now no good reason why I should deny myself that happiness.
  • I was very much in earnest.
  • I am young and earnest, and energy and determination have done wonders many a time.
  • She became so fantastically and pressingly earnest in her entreaties that we would walk up and see her apartment for an instant, and was so bent, in her harmless way, on leading me in, as part of the good omen she desired, that I (whatever the others might do) saw nothing for it but to comply.
  • I spoke to Richard with all the earnestness I felt, and all the hope I could not quite feel then, and implored him for Ada’s sake not to put any trust in Chancery.
  • However, the chances are that having ascertained the young woman to be of unblemished character, he will say to his son, ’I must be quite sure you are in earnest here.
  • And he really was so warm-hearted and earnest that in the first surprise and pleasure of his brotherly greeting I could scarcely find breath to tell him that Ada was well.
  • On whom even the fine arts, attending in powder and walking backward like the Lord Chamberlain, must array themselves in the milliners’ and tailors’ patterns of past generations and be particularly careful not to be in earnest or to receive any impress from the moving age.
  • Still I had a tormenting idea that the influence upon him extended even here, that he was postponing his best truth and earnestness in this as in all things until Jarndyce and Jarndyce should be off his mind.
  • I answered in all earnestness, "Quite."
  • "There again!" says Mr. Snagsby, who, between the earnestness of his feelings and the suppressed tones of his voice is discoloured in the face.
  • The timid little beauty promises in all earnestness to be trustworthy.
  • They shook hands upon it laughingly, but in deep earnestness.
  • Mr. George is so entirely overcome at first by this prospect that he resists the proposed honour with great earnestness.
  • Then he sat down by Richard and half playfully, half earnestly, quite naturally and easily, found out how he felt and where he had been all day.
  • I think it is rather our way to be in earnest.
  • After a short time the little round of light shone out again, and Mr. Bucket advanced towards us in it with his earnest face.
  • And he is so cheery, so fresh, so sensible, so earnest, so—everything that I am not, that the place brightens whenever he comes, and darkens whenever he goes again.
  • His noble earnestness, his fidelity, his gallant shielding of her, his generous conquest of his own wrong and his own pride for her sake, are simply honourable, manly, and true.
  • In the momentary firmness of the hand that was never still—a firmness inspired by the utterance of these last words, and dying away with them—I saw the confirmation of her earnest tones.
  • In truth she is not a hard lady naturally, and the time has been when the sight of the venerable figure suing to her with such strong earnestness would have moved her to great compassion.
  • I write this to repeat most earnestly for myself all that she said to you and to let you know how sure I am that you will sooner or later find our cousin John a pattern of truth, sincerity, and goodness, when you will deeply, deeply grieve to have done him (without intending it) so much wrong.
  • I ran forward, but they stopped me, and Mr. Woodcourt entreated me with the greatest earnestness, even with tears, before I went up to the figure to listen for an instant to what Mr. Bucket said.
  • Ada had been telling me only that morning of her hopes that Richard might exhaust his ardour in the Chancery suit by being so very earnest in it; and therefore, not to damp my dear girl’s spirits, I said nothing about Mr. Vholes’s shadow.
  • While he makes this protestation with great emotion and earnestness, looking round the room as if he were addressing an assembly, Mr. Bucket glances at him with an observant gravity in which there might be, but for the audacity of the thought, a touch of compassion.
  • And then he spoke so ingenuously and sincerely of the sacrifice he made in withdrawing himself for a time from Ada, and of the earnestness with which he aspired—as in thought he always did, I know full well—to repay her love, and to ensure her happiness, and to conquer what was amiss in himself, and to acquire the very soul of decision, that he made my heart ache keenly, sorely.
  • He was not only a very handsome old gentleman—upright and stalwart as he had been described to us— with a massive grey head, a fine composure of face when silent, a figure that might have become corpulent but for his being so continually in earnest that he gave it no rest, and a chin that might have subsided into a double chin but for the vehement emphasis in which it was constantly required to assist; but he was such a true gentleman in his manner, so chivalrously polite, his face was…
  • Mr. Jarndyce had fallen into this company in the tenderness of his heart and his earnest desire to do all the good in his power; but that he felt it to be too often an unsatisfactory company, where benevolence took spasmodic forms, where charity was assumed as a regular uniform by loud professors and speculators in cheap notoriety, vehement in profession, restless and vain in action, servile in the last degree of meanness to the great, adulatory of one another, and intolerable to those…
  • But when I came to myself and saw how shocked my guardian was and found that they were earnestly speaking of the suspected man and recalling every favourable impression we had formed of him out of the good we had known of him, my interest and my fears were so strongly aroused in his behalf that I was quite set up again.
  • Phil, on one knee at the target, is in course of protesting earnestly, though not without many allegorical scoops of his brush and smoothings of the white surface round the rim with his thumb, that he had forgotten the Bagnet responsibility and would not so much as injure a hair of the head of any member of that worthy family when steps are audible in the long passage without, and a cheerful voice is heard to wonder whether George is at home.
  • I couldn’t ask you to go with me, Miss Summerson; but if you would," said Caddy, who had said all this earnestly and tremblingly, "I should be very glad—very glad."
  • Richard shook him by both hands with an intuitive mixture of respect and frankness, and only saying (though with an earnestness that rather alarmed me, I was so afraid of Mr. Jarndyce’s suddenly disappearing), "You are very kind, sir!
  • I must do Mr. Guppy the further justice of saying that he had looked more and more ashamed and that he looked most ashamed and very earnest when he now replied with a burning face, "Upon my word and honour, upon my life, upon my soul, Miss Summerson, as I am a living man, I’ll act according to your wish!
  • "I should poorly show the trust that I have in the dear one who will evermore be as dear to me as now"—and the deep earnestness with which he said it at once strengthened me and made me weep— "if, after her assurance that she is not free to think of my love, I urged it.

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  • Both sides were deeply in earnest, even passionate.
  • She has a casual, go-with-the-flow personality and doesn’t appreciate his earnestness.

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