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Bleak House
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Used in
Bleak House
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  • That I assert no cause whatever of complaint against her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mr. Tulkinghorn re-asserts it by another inclination of his head.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "At least there is no opposition to YOU," Volumnia asserts with confidence.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It wasn't a bad profession; he couldn't assert that he disliked it; perhaps he liked it as well as he liked any other—suppose he gave it one more chance!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mr. Smallweed is at once permitted so far to assert his supremacy as to be carried on a visit of sentiment into the next house and upstairs into Miss Flite's deserted room, where he looks like a hideous bird of prey newly added to her aviary.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • If I cannot with my means and influence and my position bring all the perpetrators of such a crime to light, I fail in the assertion of my respect for that gentleman's memory and of my fidelity towards one who was ever faithful to me.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Not that she is so, but that "the most is made," as the Honourable Bob Stables has frequently asserted upon oath, "of all her points."  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He also descries promise in the figure of Mr. George himself, striding towards them in his morning exercise with his pipe in his mouth, no stock on, and his muscular arms, developed by broadsword and dumbbell, weightily asserting themselves through his light shirt-sleeves.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Which there is nothing derogatory, but far from it in the appellation," says Mr. Snagsby, breaking off with a mistrust that he may have unpolitely asserted a kind of proprietorship in Mr. Weevle, "because I have known writers that have gone into brewers' houses and done really very respectable indeed.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "Well," observed my guardian, half pleasantly, half seriously, "that's a great occasion and will give my fair cousin some necessary business to transact in assertion of her independence, and will make London a more convenient place for all of us.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "Why, of course you wanted to get in," Mr. Bucket asserts with cheerfulness; "but for a old gentleman at your time of life—what I call truly venerable, mind you!—with his wits sharpened, as I have no doubt they are, by the loss of the use of his limbs, which occasions all his animation to mount up into his head, not to consider that if he don't keep such a business as the present as close as possible it can't be worth a mag to him, is so curious! You see your temper got the better of…  (not reviewed by editor)

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as in: asserted her opinion that...
as in: asserted her authority
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