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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
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  • The question of honour here raised was, like all such questions, trivial to him.
  • Smiling at the trivial air he raised his eyes to the priest’s face and, seeing in it a mirthless reflection of the sunken day, detached his hand slowly which had acquiesced faintly in the companionship.
  • Images of the outbursts of trivial anger which he had often noted among his masters, their twitching mouths, close-shut lips and flushed cheeks, recurred to his memory, discouraging him, for all his practice of humility, by the comparison.
  • The mirth, which in the beginning of the evening had seemed to him false and trivial, was like a soothing air to him, passing gaily by his senses, hiding from other eyes the feverish agitation of his blood while through the circling of the dancers and amid the music and laughter her glance travelled to his corner, flattering, taunting, searching, exciting his heart.
  • MacCann stood his ground and said with hostile humour: —Minor poets, I suppose, are above such trivial questions as the question of universal peace.
  • Often when he had confessed his doubts and scruples—some momentary inattention at prayer, a movement of trivial anger in his soul, or a subtle wilfulness in speech or act—he was bidden by his confessor to name some sin of his past life before absolution was given him.

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  • We’re in agreement on the main issues. We just have some trivial details to work out.
  • I have heard only trivial objections.

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