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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
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  • Desire urges us to possess, to go to something; loathing urges us to abandon, to go from something.
  • The letters cut in the stained wood of the desk stared upon him, mocking his bodily weakness and futile enthusiasms and making him loathe himself for his own mad and filthy orgies.
  • Imagine such a corpse a prey to flames, devoured by the fire of burning brimstone and giving off dense choking fumes of nauseous loathsome decomposition.
  • They will remember all this and loathe themselves and their sins.
  • The feelings excited by improper art are kinetic, desire or loathing.
  • The mind is arrested and raised above desire and loathing.
  • He shook the sound out of his ears by an angry toss of his head and hurried on, stumbling through the mouldering offal, his heart already bitten by an ache of loathing and bitterness.
  • This word, though it is vague, is clear enough to keep away good and evil which excite desire and loathing.
  • The desire and loathing excited by improper esthetic means are really not esthetic emotions not only because they are kinetic in character but also because they are not more than physical.
  • Company, elsewhere a source of comfort to the afflicted, will be there a continual torment: knowledge, so much longed for as the chief good of the intellect, will there be hated worse than ignorance: light, so much coveted by all creatures from the lord of creation down to the humblest plant in the forest, will be loathed intensely.

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  • I make New Year’s resolutions every year and then loathe myself for breaking them.
  • I loathe that man. He ruined my life.

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