To better see all uses of the word
Anna Karenina
please enable javascript.

Used In
Anna Karenina
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary

as in: utter stupidity Define
complete or total (used as an intensifier--typically when stressing how bad something is)
  • Dolly was crushed by her sorrow, utterly swallowed up by it.
  • In his Petersburg world all people were divided into utterly opposed classes.

  • Show more
  • Alexey Alexandrovitch was unconsciously saying something utterly unlike what he had prepared.
  • The place was taken, and whenever he tried to imagine any of the girls he knew in that place, he felt that it was utterly impossible.
  • He felt utterly wretched.
  • She utterly lost her head.
  • He opened his mouth to tell her she had behaved unbecomingly, but he could not help saying something utterly different.
  • But she’s utterly unmoved by it.
  • "Good morning, princess," said Anna Pavlovna, with an assumed smile utterly unlike her former manner.
  • But now coming to the country as the head of a family, she perceived that it was all utterly unlike what she had fancied.

  • Show more again
  • It may very well be, I repeat, that my words seem to you utterly unnecessary and out of place; it may be that they are called forth by my mistaken impression.
  • Over the ploughland riding was utterly impossible; the horse could only keep a foothold where there was ice, and in the thawing furrows he sank deep in at each step.
  • You know we’re utterly unlike each other, different tastes and views and everything; but I know you’re fond of me and understand me, and that’s why I like you awfully.
  • But whether I am right or wrong, that pride you so despise makes any thought of Katerina Alexandrovna out of the question for me,— you understand, utterly out of the question.
  • They tried to tell her what the doctor had said, but it appeared that though the doctor had talked distinctly enough and at great length, it was utterly impossible to report what he had said.
  • At that moment, when the revelation of everything was hanging over him, there was nothing he expected so much as that she would answer mockingly as before that his suspicions were absurd and utterly groundless.
  • As they left the pavilion, Alexey Alexandrovitch, as always, talked to those he met, and Anna had, as always, to talk and answer; but she was utterly beside herself, and moved hanging on her husband’s arm as though in a dream.
  • This brother Nikolay was the elder brother of Konstantin Levin, and half-brother of Sergey Ivanovitch; a man utterly ruined, who had dissipated the greater part of his fortune, was living in the strangest and lowest company, and had quarreled with his brothers.
  • One was the renunciation of his old life, of his utterly useless education.
  • The sight of tears threw him into a state of nervous agitation, and he utterly lost all power of reflection.
  • These ladies belonged to a circle which, though of the highest society, was utterly hostile to that in which Anna moved.
  • Besides, the sister-in-law with her low-necked bodice aroused in him a feeling akin to shame and remorse for some utterly base action.
  • She was utterly unlike what she had been when he first saw her.
  • Don’t I know him, the falsity in which he’s utterly steeped?
  • Alexey Alexandrovitch was speaking so quickly that he stammered, and was utterly unable to articulate the word "suffering."
  • Levin was utterly at a loss to comprehend or recall what it was he had disliked in Sviazhsky, what he had failed to find in him.
  • And, so far from being simple, it all seemed to him utterly impossible.
  • But he was at once convinced that it was utterly impossible to him.
  • He had often heard this word technique, and was utterly unable to understand what was understood by it.
  • He was happy; but on entering upon family life he saw at every step that it was utterly different from what he had imagined.
  • And he had prepared himself for this; but he found something utterly different.
  • And, strange to say, he felt utterly cold, and was not conscious of sorrow nor of loss, less still of pity for his brother.
  • His despair was even intensified by the consciousness that he was utterly alone in his sorrow.
  • He felt he was not to blame for not having learned the lesson; however much he tried, he was utterly unable to do that.
  • That was to him something utterly inconceivable and impossible.
  • While Levin had been outside, an incident had occurred which had utterly shattered all the happiness she had been feeling that day, and her pride in her children.
  • He had thought it all over hundreds of times, and was convinced that a divorce was not at all simple, as Stepan Arkadyevitch had said, but was utterly impossible.
  • His father always talked to him—so Seryozha felt—as though he were addressing some boy of his own imagination, one of those boys that exist in books, utterly unlike himself.
  • And vast sums of money had actually been spent and were still being spent on this business, and utterly unproductively, and the whole business could obviously lead to nothing whatever.
  • In his future married life there could be, he was convinced, nothing of that sort; even the external forms, indeed, he fancied, must be utterly unlike the life of others in everything.
  • At this moment, in his present softened state of feeling, sensitive to everything, this inevitable act of hypocrisy was not merely painful to Levin, it seemed to him utterly impossible.
  • The passage at which he was utterly unable to say anything, and began fidgeting and cutting the table and swinging his chair, was where he had to repeat the patriarchs before the Flood.
  • The face dearest to him, the face of Christ, the center of the picture, which had given him such ecstasy as it unfolded itself to him, was utterly lost to him when he glanced at the picture with their eyes.
  • She knew, too, that he was really interested in books dealing with politics, philosophy, and theology, that art was utterly foreign to his nature; but, in spite of this, or rather, in consequence of it, Alexey Alexandrovitch never passed over anything in the world of art, but made it his duty to read everything.
  • Instead of being hurt, denying, defending himself, begging forgiveness, instead of remaining indifferent even—anything would have been better than what he did do—his face utterly involuntarily (reflex spinal action, reflected Stepan Arkadyevitch, who was fond of physiology)—utterly involuntarily assumed its habitual, good-humored, and therefore idiotic smile.
  • Instead of being hurt, denying, defending himself, begging forgiveness, instead of remaining indifferent even—anything would have been better than what he did do—his face utterly involuntarily (reflex spinal action, reflected Stepan Arkadyevitch, who was fond of physiology)—utterly involuntarily assumed its habitual, good-humored, and therefore idiotic smile.
  • He fancied that he understood what she was utterly unable to understand: how it was that, having made her husband wretched, having abandoned him and her son and lost her good name, she yet felt full of spirits, gaiety, and happiness.
  • Levin was wondering what that change in Kitty’s expression had meant, and alternately assuring himself that there was hope, and falling into despair, seeing clearly that his hopes were insane, and yet all the while he felt himself quite another man, utterly unlike what he had been before her smile and those words, "Good-bye till this evening."
  • Unconsciously yielding to the weakness of Anna—who had surrendered herself up to him utterly, and simply looked to him to decide her fate, ready to submit to anything—he had long ceased to think that their tie might end as he had thought then.
  • But he felt utterly different towards her beauty now.
  • And he himself felt not only in the highest degree ridicule, but also utterly guilty and disgraced.
  • "What wife, what slave can be so utterly a slave as I, in my position?" she put in gloomily.
  • "Yes, if possible," said Anna, speaking all at once in an utterly different tone, subdued and mournful.
  • All this was utterly uncalled for and stupid, and Levin felt it himself as he said it.
  • Do you know that Dolly’s position is becoming utterly impossible?
  • Although what Metrov was saying was by now utterly devoid of interest for him, he yet experienced a certain satisfaction in listening to him.
  • Among others he met Count Bol, whom he had utterly forgotten to call upon.
  • What he felt towards this little creature was utterly unlike what he had expected.
  • She had utterly forgotten where and why she was going, and only by a great effort she understood the question.
  • But my poor son was utterly given up to her.
  • "Ah, my dear fellow, you’re defeated, utterly defeated!" cried Katavasov good-humoredly.
  • And in the whole arsenal of his convictions, so far from finding any satisfactory answers, he was utterly unable to find anything at all like an answer.
  • Levin advanced, but utterly forgetting what he was to do, and much embarrassed, he turned to Sergey Ivanovitch with the question, "Where am I to put it?"
  • And these fragmentary musical expressions, though sometimes beautiful, were disagreeable, because they were utterly unexpected and not led up to by anything.
  • Of his own relations there stayed with him only Sergey Ivanovitch, but he too was a man of the Koznishev and not the Levin stamp, so that the Levin spirit was utterly obliterated.
  • Vassenka meanwhile, utterly unsuspecting the misery his presence had occasioned, got up from the table after Kitty, and watching her with smiling and admiring eyes, he followed her.
  • He had eaten nothing for a whole day, he had not slept for two nights, had spent several hours undressed in the frozen air, and felt not simply fresher and stronger than ever, but felt utterly independent of his body; he moved without muscular effort, and felt as if he could do anything.
  • "Yes, very good," he said, and as it was utterly of no consequence to him what they thought of him, he began repeating what they had heard a hundred times about the characteristics of the singer’s talent.
  • They naively believed that it was their business to lay before the commission their needs and the actual condition of things, and to ask assistance of the government, and utterly failed to grasp that some of their statements and requests supported the contention of the enemy’s side, and so spoiled the whole business.
  • But on the sixth day, when the coachman came back without him, she felt that now she was utterly incapable of stifling the thought of him and of what he was doing there, just at that time her little girl was taken ill.
  • With that expression on her face she was more beautiful than ever; but the expression was new; it was utterly unlike that expression, radiant with happiness and creating happiness, which had been caught by the painter in her portrait.
  • He even said over to himself the words in which he meant to put his offer, but instead of those words, some utterly unexpected reflection that occurred to him made him ask: "What is the difference between the ’birch’ mushroom and the ’white’ mushroom?"
  • On the day when in the drawing room of the house in Arbaty Street she had gone up to him in her brown dress, and given herself to him without a word—on that day, at that hour, there took place in her heart a complete severance from all her old life, and a quite different, new, utterly strange life had begun for her, while the old life was actually going on as before.
  • But in the depths of his heart, the older he became, and the more intimately he knew his brother, the more and more frequently the thought struck him that this faculty of working for the public good, of which he felt himself utterly devoid, was possibly not so much a quality as a lack of something —not a lack of good, honest, noble desires and tastes, but a lack of vital force, of what is called heart, of that impulse which drives a man to choose someone out of the innumerable paths of…
  • Last time he had remembered their names, but now he had forgotten them utterly, chiefly because Enoch was the personage he liked best in the whole of the Old Testament, and Enoch’s translation to heaven was connected in his mind with a whole long train of thought, in which he became absorbed now while he gazed with fascinated eyes at his father’s watch-chain and a half-unbuttoned button on his waistcoat.
  • "The most utterly loathsome and coarse: I can’t tell you.
  • …wards (the very department which was giving Levin so much trouble just now), the disposal of large sums subscribed by the nobility of the province, the high schools, female, male, and military, and popular instruction on the new model, and finally, the district council—the marshal of the province, Snetkov, was a nobleman of the old school,—dissipating an immense fortune, a good-hearted man, honest after his own fashion, but utterly without any comprehension of the needs of modern days.
  • "It’s an utterly different culture—their culture.
  • "Yes," he assented; "and Princess Tverskaya’s interference in the most difficult private affairs is utterly uncalled for.
  • "Yes," she mused, "there was something unnatural about Anna Pavlovna, and utterly unlike her good nature, when she said angrily the day before yesterday: ’There, he will keep waiting for you; he wouldn’t drink his coffee without you, though he’s grown so dreadfully weak.’
  • No, quite the contrary; I see that society takes up a sort of antagonistic attitude to these people, which is utterly baseless, and I fancy there’s envy at the bottom of it…."
  • If I knew it, then I know what I should do," she said to herself, utterly unable to picture to herself the position she would be in if she were convinced of his not caring for her.
  • Chapter 12 In the early days after his return from Moscow, whenever Levin shuddered and grew red, remembering the disgrace of his rejection, he said to himself: "This was just how I used to shudder and blush, thinking myself utterly lost, when I was plucked in physics and did not get my remove; and how I thought myself utterly ruined after I had mismanaged that affair of my sister’s that was entrusted to me.
  • Chapter 12 In the early days after his return from Moscow, whenever Levin shuddered and grew red, remembering the disgrace of his rejection, he said to himself: "This was just how I used to shudder and blush, thinking myself utterly lost, when I was plucked in physics and did not get my remove; and how I thought myself utterly ruined after I had mismanaged that affair of my sister’s that was entrusted to me.

  • There are no more uses of "utter" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

    Show samples from other sources
  • She suffered utter devastation when her child died in the accident.
  • The company is in danger of utter collapse.

  • Go to more samples

unspecified meaning
  • "Is there hope?" she meant to say, but her lips quivered, and she could not utter the question.
  • She talked on, not knowing what her lips were uttering, and not taking her supplicating and caressing eyes off him.

  • Show more
  • With pain and wrath she uttered the word so terrible to herself—_stranger_.
  • "Remember that I have forbidden you to utter that word, that hateful word," said Anna, with a shudder.
  • But at the very moment she was uttering the words, she felt that they were not true.
  • He saw it, and his face expressed that utter subjection, that slavish devotion, which had done so much to win her.
  • Again she would have said "my son," but she could not utter that word.
  • He sighed as after a danger escaped when she uttered these words.
  • Twice she uttered her usual cuckoo call, and then gave a hoarse, hurried call and broke down.
  • Kitty knew that the words she had uttered in anger about her husband’s infidelity and her humiliating position had cut her poor sister to the heart, but that she had forgiven her.

  • Show more again
  • Larks trilled unseen above the velvety green fields and the ice-covered stubble-land; peewits wailed over the low lands and marshes flooded by the pools; cranes and wild geese flew high across the sky uttering their spring calls.
  • When he was back in the carriage, he kept unceasingly going over every position in which he had seen her, every word she had uttered, and before his fancy, making his heart faint with emotion, floated pictures of a possible future.
  • And indeed, no sooner had he uttered these words, when all at once, like the sun going behind a cloud, her face lost all its friendliness, and Levin detected the familiar change in her expression that denoted the working of thought; a crease showed on her smooth brow.
  • The pain she had caused herself and her husband in uttering those words would be rewarded now by everything being made clear, she thought.
  • But neither of them dared to speak of it, and so whatever they said— not uttering the one thought that filled their minds—was all falsehood.
  • He vividly recalled the peasant again and those incomprehensible French words the peasant had uttered, and a chill of horror ran down his spine.
  • "To see her once and then to bury myself, to die," he thought, and as he was paying farewell visits, he uttered this thought to Betsy.
  • After looking at the portrait for a minute, Alexey Alexandrovitch shuddered so that his lips quivered and he uttered the sound "brrr," and turned away.
  • Alexey Alexandrovitch shuddered at the allusion to his wife, but immediately his face assumed the deathlike rigidity which expressed utter helplessness in the matter.
  • She tried to say something, but her voice refused to utter any sound; with a guilty and imploring glance at the old man she went with light, swift steps up the stairs.
  • She was frightened of the dog, that ran in after Levin, and uttered a shriek, but began laughing at her own fright at once when she was told the dog would not hurt her.
  • For those few seconds he was sure in anticipation that a higher, juster criticism would be uttered by them, by those very visitors whom he had been so despising a moment before.
  • Now when he heard that she was here, he was suddenly conscious of such delight, and at the same time of such dread, that his breath failed him and he could not utter what he wanted to say.
  • "This is my position: you can trample me in the mud, make me the laughing-stock of the world, I will not abandon her, and I will never utter a word of reproach to you," Alexey Alexandrovitch went on.
  • Chapter 29 Everyone was loudly expressing disapprobation, everyone was repeating a phrase some one had uttered—"The lions and gladiators will be the next thing," and everyone was feeling horrified; so that when Vronsky fell to the ground, and Anna moaned aloud, there was nothing very out of the way in it.
  • Sergey Ivanovitch listened attentively, asked him questions, and, roused by a new listener, he talked fluently, uttered a few keen and weighty observations, respectfully appreciated by the young doctor, and was soon in that eager frame of mind his brother knew so well, which always, with him, followed a brilliant and eager conversation.
  • And the asseverations of his love, which seemed to him so vulgar that he was ashamed to utter them, she drank in eagerly, and gradually became calmer.
  • Stepan Arkadyevitch said to Levin, hardly leaving time for everyone to utter their greetings.
  • Levin had grown used by now to uttering his thought boldly, without taking the trouble of clothing it in exact language.
  • She uttered a cry, started in the saddle, and set her horse into a gallop.
  • Levin tried to imagine circumstances in which both sayings might have been uttered, and the conversation on that topic dropped.
  • Only at rare moments, when the opium gave him an instant’s relief from the never-ceasing pain, he would sometimes, half asleep, utter what was ever more intense in his heart than in all the others: "Oh, if it were only the end!" or: "When will it be over?"
  • Alexey Alexandrovitch’s wrinkled face wore an expression of agony; he took her by the hand and tried to say something, but he could not utter it; his lower lip quivered, but he still went on struggling with his emotion, and only now and then glanced at her.
  • When they reached the house he helped her to get out of the carriage, and making an effort to master himself, took leave of her with his usual urbanity, and uttered that phrase that bound him to nothing; he said that tomorrow he would let her know his decision.
  • As soon as Oblonsky uttered Anna’s name, the face of Alexey Alexandrovitch was completely transformed; all the life was gone out of it, and it looked weary and dead.
  • Metrov repeated a saying that had reached him through a most trustworthy source, reported as having been uttered on this subject by the Tsar and one of the ministers.
  • Annushka went out, but Anna did not begin dressing, and sat in the same position, her head and hands hanging listlessly, and every now and then she shivered all over, seemed as though she would make some gesture, utter some word, and sank back into lifelessness again.
  • Church services always affected Levin, and as he uttered the words "I kiss the cross," and glanced round at the crowd of young and old men repeating the same, he felt touched.
  • Frightened by the desperate expression with which these words were uttered, he jumped up and would have run after her, but on second thoughts he sat down and scowled, setting his teeth.
  • He stood in the next room, his head leaning against the door post, and heard shrieks, howls such as he had never heard before, and he knew that what had been Kitty was uttering these shrieks.
  • Living the old life, she was horrified at herself, at her utter insurmountable callousness to all her own past, to things, to habits, to the people she had loved, who loved her—to her mother, who was wounded by her indifference, to her kind, tender father, till then dearer than all the world.
  • When she woke up next morning the first thing that rose to her mind was what she had said to her husband, and those words seemed to her so awful that she could not conceive now how she could have brought herself to utter those strange, coarse words, and could not imagine what would come of it.
  • Then he recollected that this idea, which he had heard from an acquaintance and uttered as his own, came from a fable of Krilov’s, and that the acquaintance had picked it up from a newspaper article.
  • He wanted to bring her back to the first words she had uttered about her childhood; but after a pause of some length, as though against his own will, he made an observation in response to her last words.
  • And though he thought at once how senseless was his prayer that they should not have been killed by the oak which had fallen now, he repeated it, knowing that he could do nothing better than utter this senseless prayer.
  • But he could not draw back from the generous word when it was once uttered, even though he felt now, vaguely foreseeing certain eventualities in his intrigue with Madame Karenina, that this generous word had been spoken thoughtlessly, and that even though he were not married he might need all the hundred thousand of income.
  • And as soon as these words were uttered, both he and she felt that it was over, that what was to have been said would not be said; and their emotion, which had up to then been continually growing more intense, began to subside.
  • Levin could not believe his ears, but there could be no doubt; the scream had ceased and he heard a subdued stir and bustle, and hurried breathing, and her voice, gasping, alive, tender, and blissful, uttered softly, "It’s over!"
  • The words uttered by the peasant had acted on his soul like an electric shock, suddenly transforming and combining into a single whole the whole swarm of disjointed, impotent, separate thoughts that incessantly occupied his mind.
  • Count Alexey Kirillovitch urged me very much" (as she uttered the words Count Alexey Kirillovitch she glanced with appealing timidity at Levin, and he unconsciously responded with a respectful and reassuring look); "he urged me to take up the school in the village.
  • When the reading of the report was over, people moved about, and Levin met Sviazhsky, who invited him very pressingly to come that evening to a meeting of the Society of Agriculture, where a celebrated lecture was to be delivered, and Stepan Arkadyevitch, who had only just come from the races, and many other acquaintances; and Levin heard and uttered various criticisms on the meeting, on the new fantasia, and on a public trial.
  • "You’re staying the night, I hope?" was the first word the spirit of falsehood prompted her to utter; "and now we’ll go together.
  • …cloak room of the railway station—on the table, shamelessly sprawling out among strangers, the bloodstained body so lately full of life; the head unhurt dropping back with its weight of hair, and the curling tresses about the temples, and the exquisite face, with red, half-opened mouth, the strange, fixed expression, piteous on the lips and awful in the still open eyes, that seemed to utter that fearful phrase—that he would be sorry for it—that she had said when they were quarreling.
  • "But that’s utter waste of time.
  • All I can want is that you should not desert me, as you think of doing," she said, understanding all he had not uttered.
  • The day after to-morrow’s Sunday, I have to be at maman’s," said Vronsky, embarrassed, because as soon as he uttered his mother’s name he was aware of her intent, suspicious eyes.
  • He couldn’t collect it in three years!" he heard vigorously uttered by a round-shouldered, short, country gentleman, who had pomaded hair hanging on his embroidered collar, and new boots obviously put on for the occasion, with heels that tapped energetically as he spoke.

  • There are no more uses of "utter" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: utter stupidity Define
complete or total (used as an intensifier--typically when stressing how bad something is)
as in: utter a complaint Define
say something aloud
as in: utter a sound Define
make a sound with the voice
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading