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irony
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Anna Karenina
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irony
Used In
Anna Karenina
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as in: verbal irony Define
saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else -- usually as humor or sarcasm
  • willfully refusing to see the irony of his tone,

  • There are no more uses of "irony" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She was being ironic when she said she couldn’t wait to see you again.
  • Her voice was dripping with irony as she said, "You look beautiful."

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as in: situational irony Define
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things seem incongruous together -- especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
  • ...in a tone of ironical submission to destiny.

  • There are no more uses of "irony" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She didn’t see the irony in acting like the mother she detested.
  • Ironically, he did not do as well when he concentrated on not making mistakes.

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unspecified meaning
  • He was standing with his elbows on the back of a chair, and on his face was a look of ironical attention.
  • Anna said, with tender irony.

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  • "Well, I’m listening to what’s to come," she said, calmly and ironically; "and indeed I listen with interest, for I should like to understand what’s the matter."
  • "I have!" said Anna suddenly, and, unexpectedly after her tears, a sly, ironical smile curved her lips.
  • "What’s to be done, according to you?" she asked with the same frivolous irony.
  • Perhaps it’s our strong point, really, the faculty of seeing our own shortcomings; but we overdo it, we comfort ourselves with irony which we always have on the tip of our tongues.
  • She merely smiled with a pretense of irony when he finished, and made no reply, because she had not heard what he said.
  • "That’s our aristocracy, prince!" the Moscow colonel said with ironical intention.
  • Kitty asked apprehensively, catching the gleam of irony that kindled in the prince’s eyes at the mention of Madame Stahl.
  • The prince went up to her, and Kitty detected that disconcerting gleam of irony in his eyes.

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  • "It’s splendid as exercise, only you’ll hardly be able to stand it," said Sergey Ivanovitch, without a shade of irony.
  • The unfathomable eyes gazed ironically and insolently at him.
  • "Italian bookkeeping," said the gentleman of the gray whiskers ironically.
  • He read, too, that Count Beist was rumored to have left for Wiesbaden, and that one need have no more gray hair, and of the sale of a light carriage, and of a young person seeking a situation; but these items of information did not give him, as usual, a quiet, ironical gratification.
  • Bowing her head, she greeted Alexey Alexandrovitch with an ironical smile.
  • And he saw this by the suppressed, malicious, and ironical smile with which Betsy glanced at him after this phrase.
  • Passing through rows of ironical eyes, he was drawn as naturally to her loving glance as a plant to the sun.
  • The ironical light died away in her eyes, but a different smile, a consciousness of something, he did not know what, and of quiet melancholy, came over her face.
  • Though they were divorced and lived apart, yet whenever the husband met the wife, he invariably behaved to her with the same malignant irony, the cause of which was incomprehensible.
  • Sviazhsky looked with smiling eyes at Levin, and even made a faint gesture of irony to him; but Levin did not think the landowner’s words absurd, he understood them better than he did Sviazhsky.
  • "You came in late, I think, and have missed the best song," Anna said to Vronsky, glancing ironically, he thought, at him.
  • Laska stopped, looking ironically at the horses and inquiringly at Levin.
  • I see you’re smiling ironically, but you’re wrong.
  • Kitty asked, with an ironical and loving smile.
  • "No, papa, he’s very nice, and Kostya’s very fond of him," Kitty said, with a deprecating smile, noticing the irony on her father’s face.
  • He felt this especially when he talked to the cleverest of the peasants, Ryezunov, and detected the gleam in Ryezunov’s eyes which showed so plainly both ironical amusement at Levin, and the firm conviction that, if any one were to be taken in, it would not be he, Ryezunov.
  • "Oh, we all know you can do without sleep, and keep other people up too," Dolly said to her husband, with that faint note of irony in her voice which she almost always had now with her husband.
  • Levin walked into the room, received a white ball, and followed his brother, Sergey Ivanovitch, to the table where Sviazhsky was standing with a significant and ironical face, holding his beard in his fist and sniffing at it.
  • He smiled ironically, looking at the raven horse, and was already deciding in his own mind that this smart trotter in the char-a-banc was only good for promenade, and wouldn’t do thirty miles straight off in the heat.
  • Stepan Arkadyevitch stood in a comically solemn pose beside his wife, took the holy picture, and telling Levin to bow down to the ground, he blessed him with his kindly, ironical smile, and kissed him three times; Darya Alexandrovna did the same, and immediately was in a hurry to get off, and again plunged into the intricate question of the destinations of the various carriages.
  • "That, anyway," said Nikolay Levin, with an ironical smile, his eyes flashing malignantly, "has the charm of—what’s one to call it?

  • There are no more uses of "irony" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: situational irony Define
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things seem incongruous together -- especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
as in: verbal irony Define
saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else -- usually as humor or sarcasm
as in: dramatic irony Define
when the meaning of a situation is understood by the reader or audience but not by the characters in the story (such as in the play, Romeo and Juliet)
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