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Anna Karenina
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capital -- as in: invested capital
Used In
Anna Karenina
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  • Capital.
  • "He's a capital fellow," pursued Oblonsky.
  • Everything was capital, everything was cheering.
  • The stand-shooting was capital.
  • "That merely proves either that I'm a bad manager, or that I've sunk my capital for the increase of my rents."
  • They deny the justice of property, of capital, of inheritance, while I do not deny this chief stimulus.
  • One so knows the man: a good-natured, capital fellow, but an official through and through, who does not know what it is he's doing.
  • "A capital fellow, and a keen sportsman," as Stepan Arkadyevitch said, introducing him.
  • "It's capital lying here."
  • "He really is a capital fellow, isn't he?" said Stepan Arkadyevitch, when Veslovsky had gone out and the peasant had closed the door after him.
  • "Yes, capital," answered Levin, still thinking of the subject of their conversation just before.
  • A walk now would be capital.
  • The episode of the elections served as a good occasion for a capital dinner.
  • The condition of the laborer will always depend on his relation to the land and to capital.
  • There, that's capital.
  • But a capital road.
  • "That's capital."
  • Petritsky, whom he liked, was implicated in the affair, and the other culprit was a capital fellow and first-rate comrade, who had lately joined the regiment, the young Prince Kedrov.
  • Chapter 21 After a capital dinner and a great deal of cognac drunk at Bartnyansky's, Stepan Arkadyevitch, only a little later than the appointed time, went in to Countess Lidia Ivanovna's.
  • All the skaters, it seemed, with perfect self-possession, skated towards her, skated by her, even spoke to her, and were happy, quite apart from her, enjoying the capital ice and the fine weather.
  • Katavasov went back to his own carriage, and with reluctant hypocrisy reported to Sergey Ivanovitch his observations of the volunteers, from which it would appear that they were capital fellows.
  • Capital.
  • Capital!
  • Capital!
  • Capital!
  • He saw that Metrov, like other people, in spite of his own article, in which he had attacked the current theory of political economy, looked at the position of the Russian peasant simply from the point of view of capital, wages, and rent.
  • "There are some among us, too, like our friend Nikolay Ivanovitch, or Count Vronsky, that's settled here lately, who try to carry on their husbandry as though it were a factory; but so far it leads to nothing but making away with capital on it."
  • He was going both to rest for a fortnight, and in the very heart of the people, in the farthest wilds of the country, to enjoy the sight of that uplifting of the spirit of the people, of which, like all residents in the capital and big towns, he was fully persuaded.
  • In Sergey Ivanovitch's eyes his younger brother was a capital fellow, with his heart in the right place (as he expressed it in French), but with a mind which, though fairly quick, was too much influenced by the impressions of the moment, and consequently filled with contradictions.
  • He could not admit that some dozens of men, among them his brother, had the right, on the ground of what they were told by some hundreds of glib volunteers swarming to the capital, to say that they and the newspapers were expressing the will and feeling of the people, and a feeling which was expressed in vengeance and murder.
  • He would indeed have been obliged to admit that in the eastern—much the larger—part of Russia rent was as yet nil, that for nine-tenths of the eighty millions of the Russian peasants wages took the form simply of food provided for themselves, and that capital does not so far exist except in the form of the most primitive tools.
  • This influence was due to his wealth and reputation, the capital house in the town lent him by his old friend Shirkov, who had a post in the department of finances and was director of a flourishing bank in Kashin; the excellent cook Vronsky had brought from the country, and his friendship with the governor, who was a schoolfellow of Vronsky's—a schoolfellow he had patronized and protected indeed.
  • He saw that Russia has splendid land, splendid laborers, and that in certain cases, as at the peasant's on the way to Sviazhsky's, the produce raised by the laborers and the land is great—in the majority of cases when capital is applied in the European way the produce is small, and that this simply arises from the fact that the laborers want to work and work well only in their own peculiar way, and that this antagonism is not incidental but invariable, and has its roots in the national…
  • Nikolay Levin went on talking: "You know that capital oppresses the laborer.
  • Capital, we'll drive over."
  • But there was a gleam of alarm in Sviazhsky's eyes, and he said smiling: "No; that screaming story is positively capital!
  • "I've just been seeing him, and he's really a capital fellow.
  • No, really he's a capital fellow."
  • "I am very glad of one thing," said Anna to Golenishtchev when they were on their way back, "Alexey will have a capital atelier.
  • "Capital! we'll make the bigger bag!
  • Capital!" said Stepan Arkadyevitch.
  • "Alphonse Karr said a capital thing before the war with Prussia: 'You consider war to be inevitable?
  • "That's capital!

  • There are no more uses of "capital" in the book.

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  • She worked hard to raise capital to start their new company.
  • She also earned additional income from a capital investment in her friend's company.

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