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disinclined
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Anna Karenina
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disinclined
Used In
Anna Karenina
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  • Levin sat down by them; he felt disinclined to go away.
  • He, too, felt suddenly good-humored and disinclined to leave his brother’s side.
  • "If you want to go out, let’s go together," he said, disinclined to be parted from his brother, who seemed positively breathing out freshness and energy.
  • Darya Alexandrovna felt disinclined to leave the peasant women, so interesting to her was their conversation, so completely identical were all their interests.
  • She had by now got her household matters so satisfactorily arranged, thanks to Marya Philimonovna, that she was disinclined to make any change in them; besides, she had no faith in Levin’s knowledge of farming.
  • But his wife might wonder why he did not go to her as usual; and so, overcoming his disinclination, he went towards the bedroom.
  • And in spite of the complete, as he supposed, contempt and indifference he now felt for his wife, at the bottom of his heart Alexey Alexandrovitch still had one feeling left in regard to her—a disinclination to see her free to throw in her lot with Vronsky, so that her crime would be to her advantage.

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  • I’m disinclined to believe him.
  • Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
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