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Anna Karenina
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Anna Karenina
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  • Of course, from the point of view of Prokofy, seeing him in a torn cloak and tipsy, he’s a despicable person.
  • "Konstantin Dmitrievitch despises and hates town and us townspeople," said Countess Nordston.
  • You despise public official work because you want the reality to be invariably corresponding all the while with the aim—and that’s not how it is.
  • Such a discovery now would only mean breaking up family habits, and she let herself be deceived, despising him and still more herself, for the weakness.
  • In the same way Levin in his heart despised the town mode of life of his friend, and his official duties, which he laughed at, and regarded as trifling.
  • Consequently Vronsky had the right to despise Levin, and therefore he was his enemy.
  • "Ah, pride, pride!" said Darya Alexandrovna, as though despising him for the baseness of this feeling in comparison with that other feeling which only women know.
  • For the demi-monde the members of that fashionable world believed that they despised, though their tastes were not merely similar, but in fact identical.
  • But in spite of this, each of them—as is often the way with men who have selected careers of different kinds—though in discussion he would even justify the other’s career, in his heart despised it.
  • But whether I am right or wrong, that pride you so despise makes any thought of Katerina Alexandrovna out of the question for me,— you understand, utterly out of the question.
  • Levin felt that, in spite of all the ugliness of his life, his brother Nikolay, in his soul, in the very depths of his soul, was no more in the wrong than the people who despised him.
  • She was right, for Levin actually could not bear her, and despised her for what she was proud of and regarded as a fine characteristic—her nervousness, her delicate contempt and indifference for everything coarse and earthly.
  • He doesn’t believe even in my love for my child, or he despises it (just as he always used to ridicule it).
  • He despised the nobility, and believed the mass of the nobility to be secretly in favor of serfdom, and only concealing their views from cowardice.
  • But this sense of his own humiliation before the man he had unjustly despised made up only a small part of his misery.
  • I respect your past and despise your present…. that I was far from the interpretation you put on my words.
  • The Countess Nordston and Levin got into that relation with one another not seldom seen in society, when two persons, who remain externally on friendly terms, despise each other to such a degree that they cannot even take each other seriously, and cannot even be offended by each other.
  • For those few seconds he was sure in anticipation that a higher, juster criticism would be uttered by them, by those very visitors whom he had been so despising a moment before.
  • In spite of the fact that, preparing herself for meeting him, she had schooled herself to despise and reproach him, she did not know what to say to him, and she felt sorry for him.
  • He will grow up despising me, with his father, whom I’ve abandoned.
  • But she hates me, despises me?
  • It would only be interesting to see Kitty, to show her how I despise everyone and everything, how nothing matters to me now.
  • And she despises me.
  • Dolly was in despair, she detested her husband, despised him, pitied him, resolved on a separation, resolved to refuse, but ended by agreeing to sell part of her property.
  • Don’t despise me.
  • He despises that feeling in me, but he knows that I won’t abandon my child, that I can’t abandon my child, that there could be no life for me without my child, even with him whom I love; but that if I abandoned my child and ran away from him, I should be acting like the most infamous, basest of women.
  • And all of a sudden, instead of his life with his wife being made on an individual pattern, it was, on the contrary, entirely made up of the pettiest details, which he had so despised before, but which now, by no will of his own, had gained an extraordinary importance that it was useless to contend against.
  • He could not now reconcile his immediate past, his tenderness, his love for his sick wife, and for the other man’s child with what was now the case, that is with the fact that, as it were, in return for all this he now found himself alone, put to shame, a laughing-stock, needed by no one, and despised by everyone.
  • He’s cultivated, one sees, simply to be able to despise culture, as they despise everything but animal pleasures."
  • He’s cultivated, one sees, simply to be able to despise culture, as they despise everything but animal pleasures."
  • "Oh, if I had known," said Anna, "that you do not despise me!

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  • She despises the people he has to work for.
  • They despise each other.

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