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compassion
in
Anna Karenina
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compassion
Used In
Anna Karenina
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  • She recalled the timid, softened look with which he gazed at her, and the strange feeling of compassion and awkwardness, and later of a sense of her own goodness, which she had felt at it.
  • At the mention of letters the lawyer pursed up his lips, and gave utterance to a thin little compassionate and contemptuous sound.
  • Madame Stahl talked to Kitty as to a charming child that one looks on with pleasure as on the memory of one’s youth, and only once she said in passing that in all human sorrows nothing gives comfort but love and faith, and that in the sight of Christ’s compassion for us no sorrow is trifling—and immediately talked of other things.
  • Kitty said naively, looking compassionately into her eyes.
  • This splendid baby excited in him no feeling but disgust and compassion.
  • At first, from a feeling of compassion alone, he had been interested in the delicate little creature, who was not his child, and who was cast on one side during her mother’s illness, and would certainly have died if he had not troubled about her, and he did not himself observe how fond he became of her.
  • He did not understand why the old princess took his hand, and looking compassionately at him, begged him not to worry himself, and Dolly persuaded him to eat something and led him out of the room, and even the doctor looked seriously and with commiseration at him and offered him a drop of something.

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  • If I see one hungry child, I feel compassion, but when I hear of a million hungry children, I’m overwhelmed and turn my mind to other things.
  • It is not enough to be compassionate. We must act. It is not enough to act. We must act with intelligence.

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