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pavilion
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Anna Karenina
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pavilion
Used In
Anna Karenina
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  • From the sheds he could see a perfect sea of carriages, and people on foot, soldiers surrounding the race course, and pavilions swarming with people.
  • Linon, said something to her, and went towards the pavilion where the ladies took off their skates.
  • He went towards the pavilions at the most favorable moment for escaping attention.
  • Kitty was thinking at that time, as she came out of the pavilion with Mlle.
  • Vronsky intentionally avoided that select crowd of the upper world, which was moving and talking with discreet freedom before the pavilions.
  • Seventeen officers, looking serious and severe, many with pale faces, met together in the pavilion and drew the numbers.
  • The race course was a large three-mile ring of the form of an ellipse in front of the pavilion.
  • The great barrier stood just in front of the imperial pavilion.
  • "There’s so much splendor here that one’s eyes are dazzled," he said, and he went into the pavilion.
  • Below, near the pavilion, was standing an adjutant-general of whom Alexey Alexandrovitch had a high opinion, noted for his intelligence and culture.
  • At that moment a tall general walked through the pavilion.
  • She saw now that from the place of Vronsky’s accident an officer was running across the course towards the pavilion.
  • "No," answered Vronsky, and without even glancing round towards the pavilion where his friend was pointing out Madame Karenina, he went up to his mare.
  • Chapter 28 When Alexey Alexandrovitch reached the race-course, Anna was already sitting in the pavilion beside Betsy, in that pavilion where all the highest society had gathered.
  • Chapter 28 When Alexey Alexandrovitch reached the race-course, Anna was already sitting in the pavilion beside Betsy, in that pavilion where all the highest society had gathered.
  • At the time when the racers had to go to the pavilion to receive the prizes, and all attention was directed to that point, Vronsky’s elder brother, Alexander, a colonel with heavy fringed epaulets, came up to him.
  • Vronsky had not had time to look at the saddle, about which he had to give some direction, when the competitors were summoned to the pavilion to receive their numbers and places in the row at starting.
  • As they left the pavilion, Alexey Alexandrovitch, as always, talked to those he met, and Anna had, as always, to talk and answer; but she was utterly beside herself, and moved hanging on her husband’s arm as though in a dream.
  • From his glances towards the ladies’ pavilion (he was staring straight at her, but did not distinguish his wife in the sea of muslin, ribbons, feathers, parasols and flowers) she saw that he was looking for her, but she purposely avoided noticing him.
  • She watched his progress towards the pavilion, saw him now responding condescendingly to an ingratiating bow, now exchanging friendly, nonchalant greetings with his equals, now assiduously trying to catch the eye of some great one of this world, and taking off his big round hat that squeezed the tips of his ears.
  • Stepan Arkadyevitch described what grouse moors this Malthus had bought in the Tver province, and how they were preserved, and of the carriages and dogcarts in which the shooting party had been driven, and the luncheon pavilion that had been rigged up at the marsh.
  • On this course nine obstacles had been arranged: the stream, a big and solid barrier five feet high, just before the pavilion, a dry ditch, a ditch full of water, a precipitous slope, an Irish barricade (one of the most difficult obstacles, consisting of a mound fenced with brushwood, beyond which was a ditch out of sight for the horses, so that the horse had to clear both obstacles or might be killed); then two more ditches filled with water, and one dry one; and the end of the race…
  • …had been arranged: the stream, a big and solid barrier five feet high, just before the pavilion, a dry ditch, a ditch full of water, a precipitous slope, an Irish barricade (one of the most difficult obstacles, consisting of a mound fenced with brushwood, beyond which was a ditch out of sight for the horses, so that the horse had to clear both obstacles or might be killed); then two more ditches filled with water, and one dry one; and the end of the race was just facing the pavilion.
  • "He’s looking for his wife, and she’s in the middle of the pavilion.

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  • We’re meeting for a picnic under the pavilion at the park.
  • The Chinese pavilion at the World’s Fair was fabulous.

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