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Anna Karenina
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Anna Karenina
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  • There she met Vronsky, and experienced an agitating joy at those meetings.
  • But, in spite of that, the mother had spent the whole of that winter in a state of terrible anxiety and agitation.
  • "Couldn’t one do anything for her?" said Madame Karenina in an agitated whisper.
  • "No, she could not tell an untruth with those eyes," thought the mother, smiling at her agitation and happiness.
  • Towards the end of the race everyone was in a state of agitation, which was intensified by the fact that the Tsar was displeased.
  • On the contrary, he needed occupation and distraction quite apart from his love, so as to recruit and rest himself from the violent emotions that agitated him.
  • Levin asked in agitation.
  • He answered her questions, and, seeing that she was agitated, trying to calm her, he began telling her in the simplest tone the details of his preparations for the races.
  • The first fall—Kuzovlev’s, at the stream—agitated everyone, but Alexey Alexandrovitch saw distinctly on Anna’s pale, triumphant face that the man she was watching had not fallen.
  • Chapter 24 When Vronsky looked at his watch on the Karenins’ balcony, he was so greatly agitated and lost in his thoughts that he saw the figures on the watch’s face, but could not take in what time it was.
  • From the day she left Italy the thought of it had never ceased to agitate her.
  • He saw that instead of doing as he had intended—that is to say, warning his wife against a mistake in the eyes of the world—he had unconsciously become agitated over what was the affair of her conscience, and was struggling against the barrier he fancied between them.
  • The sight of tears threw him into a state of nervous agitation, and he utterly lost all power of reflection.
  • Dolly’s agitation had an effect on Alexey Alexandrovitch.
  • The nervous agitation of Alexey Alexandrovitch kept increasing, and had by now reached such a point that he ceased to struggle with it.
  • She noticed his strange face, agitated and gloomy, and a panic came over her.
  • But other people’s criticisms, whatever they might be, had yet immense consequence in his eyes, and they agitated him to the depths of his soul.
  • To break it, and to show he was not agitated, he made an effort and addressed Golenishtchev.
  • Today he was too much agitated.
  • Any remark, the most insignificant, that showed that the critic saw even the tiniest part of what he saw in the picture, agitated him to the depths of his soul.
  • "Well now, we can sit quietly," said Countess Lidia Ivanovna, slipping hurriedly with an agitated smile between the table and the sofa, "and talk over our tea."
  • He suddenly felt that what he had regarded as nervous agitation was on the contrary a blissful spiritual condition that gave him all at once a new happiness he had never known.
  • Anna, forgetting her inward agitation in the work of packing, was standing at a table in her boudoir, packing her traveling bag, when Annushka called her attention to the rattle of some carriage driving up.
  • But, my darling, it’s not right for you to be agitated.
  • "Heavy is the cap of Monomach," Stepan Arkadyevitch said playfully, hinting, evidently, not simply at the princess’s conversation, but at the cause of Levin’s agitation, which he had noticed.
  • And no longer considering that the peasant could see her tear-stained and his agitated face, that they looked like people fleeing from some disaster, they went on with rapid steps, feeling that they must speak out and clear up misunderstandings, must be alone together, and so get rid of the misery they were both feeling.

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  • Our goal is to agitate public unrest, so there will be a cry for change.
  • She gets agitated whenever the topic comes up.

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