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Anna Karenina
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Anna Karenina
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  • Death, the inevitable end of all, for the first time presented itself to him with irresistible force.
  • He vividly recalled all the constantly recurring instances of inevitable necessity for lying and deceit, which were so against his natural bent.
  • How it would be proved he could not tell, but he knew that this would inevitably be logically proved to him, and he awaited the proofs.
  • Round the samovar and the hostess the conversation had been meanwhile vacillating in just the same way between three inevitable topics: the latest piece of public news, the theater, and scandal.
  • It was all horribly disgusting, yet to Levin it appeared not at all in the same disgusting light as it inevitably would to those who did not know Nikolay, did not know all his story, did not know his heart.
  • Chapter 18 Although all Vronsky’s inner life was absorbed in his passion, his external life unalterably and inevitably followed along the old accustomed lines of his social and regimental ties and interests.
  • She could not guess that that expression arose from the first idea that presented itself to Vronsky—that a duel was now inevitable.
  • But at the same time, he felt that the turning-point he had been longing for had come now; that it was impossible to go on concealing things from her husband, and it was inevitable in one way or another that they should soon put an end to their unnatural position.
  • Vronsky meant that after the duel—inevitable, he thought— things could not go on as before, but he said something different.
  • Everyone knew that he must inevitably die soon, that he was half dead already.
  • And what was this inevitable death—he did not know, had never thought about it, and what was more, had not the power, had not the courage to think about it.
  • This feeling was now even stronger than before; even less than before did he feel capable of apprehending the meaning of death, and its inevitability rose up before him more terrible than ever.
  • At this moment, in his present softened state of feeling, sensitive to everything, this inevitable act of hypocrisy was not merely painful to Levin, it seemed to him utterly impossible.
  • His whole life had been spent in administrative work, and consequently, when he did not approve of anything, his disapproval was softened by the recognition of the inevitability of mistakes and the possibility of reform in every department.
  • The sight of his brother, and the nearness of death, revived in Levin that sense of horror in face of the insoluble enigma, together with the nearness and inevitability of death, that had come upon him that autumn evening when his brother had come to him.
  • Now the thought of death seemed no longer so terrible and so clear to her, and death itself no longer seemed so inevitable.
  • When they reached the second marsh, which was fairly large, and would inevitably take some time to shoot over, Levin tried to persuade them to pass it by.
  • Only during the first days of his stay in Moscow Levin had been struck by the expenditure, strange to one living in the country, unproductive but inevitable, that was expected of him on every side.
  • But yet inevitably the Shtcherbatskys were thrown most into the society of a Moscow lady, Marya Yevgenyevna Rtishtcheva and her daughter, whom Kitty disliked, because she had fallen ill, like herself, over a love affair, and a Moscow colonel, whom Kitty had known from childhood, and always seen in uniform and epaulets, and who now, with his little eyes and his open neck and flowered cravat, was uncommonly ridiculous and tedious, because there was no getting rid of him.
  • "I am very grateful to you for your confidence, butů." he said, feeling with confusion and annoyance that what he could decide easily and clearly by himself, he could not discuss before Princess Tverskaya, who to him stood for the incarnation of that brute force which would inevitably control him in the life he led in the eyes of the world, and hinder him from giving way to his feeling of love and forgiveness.
  • "I have inevitably made that man wretched," she thought; "but I don’t want to profit by his misery.
  • "Alphonse Karr said a capital thing before the war with Prussia: ’You consider war to be inevitable?
  • "Oh, my theory’s this: war is on one side such a beastly, cruel, and awful thing, that no one man, not to speak of a Christian, can individually take upon himself the responsibility of beginning wars; that can only be done by a government, which is called upon to do this, and is driven inevitably into war.

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  • It is as inevitable as death and taxes.
  • The leaves fall each year with the inevitable change of the seasons.

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