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devoid
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Anna Karenina
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devoid
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Anna Karenina
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  • She knew that in politics, in philosophy, in theology, Alexey Alexandrovitch often had doubts, and made investigations; but on questions of art and poetry, and, above all, of music, of which he was totally devoid of understanding, he had the most distinct and decided opinions.
  • Although what Metrov was saying was by now utterly devoid of interest for him, he yet experienced a certain satisfaction in listening to him.
  • Alexey Alexandrovitch, like Lidia Ivanovna indeed, and others who shared their views, was completely devoid of vividness of imagination, that spiritual faculty in virtue of which the conceptions evoked by the imagination become so vivid that they must needs be in harmony with other conceptions, and with actual fact.
  • But in the depths of his heart, the older he became, and the more intimately he knew his brother, the more and more frequently the thought struck him that this faculty of working for the public good, of which he felt himself utterly devoid, was possibly not so much a quality as a lack of something —not a lack of good, honest, noble desires and tastes, but a lack of vital force, of what is called heart, of that impulse which drives a man to choose someone out of the innumerable paths of…
  • "I can’t understand," said Sergey Ivanovitch, who had observed his brother’s clumsiness, "I can’t understand how anyone can be so absolutely devoid of political tact.

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  • She imagines a world devoid of emotion.
  • He who is devoid of the power to forgive, is devoid of the power to love.
    Martin Luther King, Jr.

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