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apparent
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Anna Karenina
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apparent
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Anna Karenina
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  • It was apparent at the first glance.
  • There was apparently nothing striking either in her dress or her attitude.
  • But Stepan Arkadyevitch apparently did not care to allow him the satisfaction of giving the French names of the dishes.
  • But over her own daughters she had felt how far from simple and easy is the business, apparently so commonplace, of marrying off one’s daughters.
  • But apparently she did not care to pursue the conversation in that strain, and she turned to the old countess.
  • The second race was apparently going on, for just as he went into the sheds he heard a bell ringing.
  • At half-past nine o’clock a particularly joyful and pleasant family conversation over the tea-table at the Oblonskys’ was broken up by an apparently simple incident.
  • The prince apparently had plenty more to say, but as soon as the princess heard his tone she subsided at once, and became penitent, as she always did on serious occasions.
  • He felt that Yashvin, in spite of his apparent contempt for every sort of feeling, was the only man who could, so he fancied, comprehend the intense passion which now filled his whole life.
  • Chapter 19 In spite of Vronsky’s apparently frivolous life in society, he was a man who hated irregularity.
  • Under the influence of anger he apparently regained complete possession of all his faculties.
  • Obviously the landowner was chaffing Sviazhsky, who, far from resenting it, was apparently amused by it.
  • He evidently quite misunderstood, and apparently intentionally misunderstood, the conditions upon which the land had been given to him.
  • His brilliant black eyes were looking straight at the excited country gentleman with gray whiskers, and apparently he derived amusement from his remarks.
  • There was apparently nothing extraordinary in what she said, but what unutterable meaning there was for him in every sound, in every turn of her lips, her eyes, her hand as she said it!
  • And in the happiest frame of mind Sviazhsky got up and walked off, apparently supposing the conversation to have ended at the very point when to Levin it seemed that it was only just beginning.
  • These measures, still further exaggerated in opposition to what was Alexey Alexandrovitch’s fundamental idea, were passed by the commission, and then the aim of Stremov’s tactics became apparent.
  • Levin was silent, looking at the unknown faces of Oblonsky’s two companions, and especially at the hand of the elegant Grinevitch, which had such long white fingers, such long yellow filbert-shaped nails, and such huge shining studs on the shirt-cuff, that apparently they absorbed all his attention, and allowed him no freedom of thought.
  • Moreover, it was apparent also that the harrows and all the agricultural implements, which he had directed to be looked over and repaired in the winter, for which very purpose he had hired three carpenters, had not been put into repair, and the harrows were being repaired when they ought to have been harrowing the field.
  • He begged pardon, and was getting into the carriage, but felt he must glance at her once more; not that she was very beautiful, not on account of the elegance and modest grace which were apparent in her whole figure, but because in the expression of her charming face, as she passed close by him, there was something peculiarly caressing and soft.
  • Their life was apparently such that nothing better could be desired.
  • "It’s wider to the right; you two go that way and I’ll take the left," he said with apparent carelessness.
  • "Into the infantry when they need artillery more than anything?" said Katavasov, fancying from the artilleryman’s apparent age that he must have reached a fairly high grade.
  • "Though indeed I fail to comprehend how, with the independence you show," he went on, getting hot, "—announcing your infidelity to your husband and seeing nothing reprehensible in it, apparently—you can see anything reprehensible in performing a wife’s duties in relation to your husband."
  • "Yes, now he has laid aside all pretense, and all his cold hatred for me is apparent," she thought, not hearing his words, but watching with terror the cold, cruel judge who looked mocking her out of his eyes.
  • As no one was paying any attention to him, and no one apparently needed him, he quietly slipped away into the little room where the refreshments were, and again had a great sense of comfort when he saw the waiters.
  • Noticing this, and that Princess Varvara at once made haste to change the conversation by talking of Petersburg acquaintances, and remembering what Vronsky had without apparent connection said in the garden of his work in the country, Dolly surmised that this question of public activity was connected with some deep private disagreement between Anna and Vronsky.
  • All the marvelous conclusions they have reached about the distances, weights, movements, and deflections of the heavenly bodies are only founded on the apparent motions of the heavenly bodies about a stationary earth, on that very motion I see before me now, which has been so for millions of men during long ages, and was and will be always alike, and can always be trusted.
  • From a child upů." he was beginning with flashing eyes, apparently catching Levin’s enthusiasm, just as people catch yawning.
  • _" Everyone had apparently shared this feeling, though from politeness they had not expressed it.
  • What are you saying?" cried Oblonsky, and his suffering was apparent in his face.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • The effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the dry fields.
  • The committee investigated some apparent discrepancies.

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