To see all instances of the word
intrigue
used in
War and Peace
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intrigue
Used in
War and Peace
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  • But this intrigue did not now occupy the old man's mind.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Who doesn't have intrigues nowadays?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There was talk of his intrigues with some of the ladies, and he flirted with a few of them at the balls.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • If Bennigsen insisted on the position being defended and others still discussed it, the question was no longer important in itself but only as a pretext for disputes and intrigue.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There were the same receptions and balls, the same French theater, the same court interests and service interests and intrigues as usual.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Pierre expected to find Prince Andrew in almost the same state as Natasha and was therefore surprised on entering the drawing room to hear him in the study talking in a loud animated voice about some intrigue going on in Petersburg.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In the troubled waters of conflicting and intersecting intrigues that eddied about the Emperor's headquarters, it was possible to succeed in many ways unthinkable at other times.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In his person, honor was shown to a simple fighting Russian soldier without connections and intrigues, and to one who was associated by memories of the Italian campaign with the name of Suvorov.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • While disputes and intrigues were going on about the future field of battle, and while we were looking for the French—having lost touch with them—the French stumbled upon Neverovski's division and reached the walls of Smolensk.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In all these plottings the subject of intrigue was generally the conduct of the war, which all these men believed they were directing; but this affair of the war went on independently of them, as it had to go: that is, never in the way people devised, but flowing always from the essential attitude of the masses.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time….  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He felt that sooner or later he would have to re-enter that whirlpool of life, with its embarrassments and affairs to be straightened out, its accounts with stewards, quarrels, and intrigues, its ties, society, and with Sonya's love and his promise to her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • My brother Masons swear by the blood that they are ready to sacrifice everything for their neighbor, but they do not give a ruble each to the collections for the poor, and they intrigue, the Astraea Lodge against the Manna Seekers, and fuss about an authentic Scotch carpet and a charter that nobody needs, and the meaning of which the very man who wrote it does not understand.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Amid the uncertainties of the position, with the menace of serious danger giving a peculiarly threatening character to everything, amid this vortex of intrigue, egotism, conflict of views and feelings, and the diversity of race among these people—this eighth and largest party of those preoccupied with personal interests imparted great confusion and obscurity to the common task.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And some years pass during which he plays a pitiful comedy to himself in solitude on his island, justifying his actions by intrigues and lies when the justification is no longer needed, and displaying to the whole world what it was that people had mistaken for strength as long as an unseen hand directed his actions.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The luring of Napoleon into the depths of the country was not the result of any plan, for no one believed it to be possible; it resulted from a most complex interplay of intrigues, aims, and wishes among those who took part in the war and had no perception whatever of the inevitable, or of the one way of saving Russia.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Nor could there have been a war had there been no English intrigues and no Duke of Oldenburg, and had Alexander not felt insulted, and had there not been an autocratic government in Russia, or a Revolution in France and a subsequent dictatorship and Empire, or all the things that produced the French Revolution, and so on.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Moment by moment the event is imperceptibly shaping itself, and at every moment of this continuous, uninterrupted shaping of events the commander in chief is in the midst of a most complex play of intrigues, worries, contingencies, authorities, projects, counsels, threats, and deceptions and is continually obliged to reply to innumerable questions addressed to him, which constantly conflict with one another.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It lies in the fact that an historic character like Alexander I, standing on the highest possible pinnacle of human power with the blinding light of history focused upon him; a character exposed to those strongest of all influences: the intrigues, flattery, and self-deception inseparable from power; a character who at every moment of his life felt a responsibility for all that was happening in Europe; and not a fictitious but a live character who like every man had his personal habits,…  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Stein, a traitor expelled from his own country; Armfeldt, a rake and an intriguer; Wintzingerode, a fugitive French subject; Bennigsen, rather more of a soldier than the others, but all the same an incompetent who was unable to do anything in 1807 and who should awaken terrible memories in the Emperor Alexander's mind….  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Intriguer!" she hissed viciously, and tugged with all her might at the portfolio.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Shinshin, lowering his voice, began to tell the count of some intrigue of Kuragin's in Moscow, and Natasha tried to overhear it just because he had said she was "charmante.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I knew that I could expect nothing but meanness, deceit, envy, intrigue, and ingratitude—the blackest ingratitude—in this house…" "Do you or do you not know where that will is?" insisted Prince Vasili, his cheeks twitching more than ever.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • By intrigues, violence, exile, and executions, French society—I mean good French society—will have been forever destroyed, and then…" He shrugged his shoulders and spread out his hands.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: involved in intrigue
as in: she was intrigued
To see an overview of word senses (including some not listed above), click here.

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