To see all instances of the word
deduction
used in
War and Peace
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deduction
Used in
War and Peace
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • For a Frenchman that deduction was indubitable.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • This something was a most subtle spiritual deduction from a conversation with Karataev the day before.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It needs no critical exertion to reduce utterly to dust any deductions drawn from history.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He heard what they said, but did not understand the meaning of the words and made no kind of deduction from or application of them.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The incontestable proof of this deduction is that, however many commands were issued, the event does not take place unless there are other causes for it, but as soon as an event occurs—be it what it may—then out of all the continually expressed wishes of different people some will always be found which by their meaning and their time of utterance are related as commands to the events.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Natasha and Pierre, left alone, also began to talk as only a husband and wife can talk, that is, with extraordinary clearness and rapidity, understanding and expressing each other's thoughts in ways contrary to all rules of logic, without premises, deductions, or conclusions, and in a quite peculiar way.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But the same series of experiments and arguments proves to him that the complete freedom of which he is conscious in himself is impossible, and that his every action depends on his organization, his character, and the motives acting upon him; yet man never submits to the deductions of these experiments and arguments.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Along that line of thought such a deduction is indubitable, as indubitable as the deduction Voltaire made in jest (without knowing what he was jesting at) when he saw that the Massacre of St. Bartholomew was due to Charles IX's stomach being deranged.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Along that line of thought such a deduction is indubitable, as indubitable as the deduction Voltaire made in jest (without knowing what he was jesting at) when he saw that the Massacre of St. Bartholomew was due to Charles IX's stomach being deranged.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: deduction from the bill
as in: logical deduction
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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