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deception
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War and Peace
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deception
Used In
War and Peace
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  • So thought Pierre, and the whole of this general deception which everyone accepts, accustomed as he was to it, astonished him each time as if it were something new.
  • Every sphere of work was connected, in his eyes, with evil and deception.
  • Julie saw Boris’ indecision, and sometimes the thought occurred to her that she was repulsive to him, but her feminine self-deception immediately supplied her with consolation, and she told herself that he was only shy from love.
  • Count Rostopchin was mentally preparing the angry and stinging reproaches he meant to address to Kutuzov for his deception.
  • Lanfrey, a Republican, says it was based on his trickery and deception of the people.
  • They disappeared into the forest, and Count Orlov-Denisov, having seen Grekov off, returned, shivering from the freshness of the early dawn and excited by what he had undertaken on his own responsibility, and began looking at the enemy camp, now just visible in the deceptive light of dawn and the dying campfires.
  • But whether because stupidity was just what was needed to run such a salon, or because those who were deceived found pleasure in the deception, at any rate it remained unexposed and Helene Bezukhova’s reputation as a lovely and clever woman became so firmly established that she could say the emptiest and stupidest things and everybody would go into raptures over every word of hers and look for a profound meaning in it of which she herself had no conception.
  • Moment by moment the event is imperceptibly shaping itself, and at every moment of this continuous, uninterrupted shaping of events the commander in chief is in the midst of a most complex play of intrigues, worries, contingencies, authorities, projects, counsels, threats, and deceptions and is continually obliged to reply to innumerable questions addressed to him, which constantly conflict with one another.
  • …able to make their warlike movement to Moscow it was necessary: (1) that they should form themselves into a military group of a size able to endure a collision with the warlike military group of the east, (2) that they should abandon all established traditions and customs, and (3) that during their military movement they should have at their head a man who could justify to himself and to them the deceptions, robberies, and murders which would have to be committed during that movement.
  • …an historic character like Alexander I, standing on the highest possible pinnacle of human power with the blinding light of history focused upon him; a character exposed to those strongest of all influences: the intrigues, flattery, and self-deception inseparable from power; a character who at every moment of his life felt a responsibility for all that was happening in Europe; and not a fictitious but a live character who like every man had his personal habits, passions, and impulses…
  • "I understand the deception and confusion," he thought, "but how am I to tell them all that I see?

  • There are no more uses of "deception" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • However, like all dangerous deceptions, the lies that clappers tell themselves wear seductive disguises.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • Not to know after all these years that deception can hide in plain sight?
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Heavenly Fire

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