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militia
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War and Peace
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militia
Used In
War and Peace
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  • Orders were given to raise recruits, ten men in every thousand for the regular army, and besides this, nine men in every thousand for the militia.
  • What if the Smolensk people have offahd to waise militia for the Empewah?
  • Have we fo’gotten the waising of the militia in the yeah ’seven?
  • And was our militia of any use to the Empia?
  • But to judge what is best—conscription or the militia—we can leave to the supreme authority….
  • So I write you frankly: call out the militia.
  • I told them his election as chief of the militia would not please the Emperor.
  • "A forfeit!" cried a young man in militia uniform whom Julie called "mon chevalier," and who was going with her to Nizhni.
  • No, no," she said to the militia officer, "you won’t catch me.
  • "You will, of course, command it yourself?" said Julie, directing a sly, sarcastic glance toward the militia officer.
  • "If he manages the business properly he will be able to pay off all his debts," said the militia officer, speaking of Rostov.
  • "Forfeit, forfeit!" cried the militia officer.
  • "Another romance," said the militia officer.
  • "What are you saying about the militia?" he asked Boris.
  • By rights I am a militia officer, but my men are not here.
  • Petya was not at home, he had gone to visit a friend with whom he meant to obtain a transfer from the militia to the active army.
  • The commander of the militia was a civilian general, an old man who was evidently pleased with his military designation and rank.
  • From the commander of the militia he drove to the governor.
  • I am a militia officer and have not quitted Moscow.
  • They did not stop at any one of these positions because Kutuzov did not wish to occupy a position he had not himself chosen, because the popular demand for a battle had not yet expressed itself strongly enough, and because Miloradovich had not yet arrived with the militia, and for many other reasons.
  • One of the visitors, usually spoken of as "a man of great merit," having described how he had that day seen Kutuzov, the newly chosen chief of the Petersburg militia, presiding over the enrollment of recruits at the Treasury, cautiously ventured to suggest that Kutuzov would be the man to satisfy all requirements.
  • So naturally, simply, and gradually—just as he had come from Turkey to the Treasury in Petersburg to recruit the militia, and then to the army when he was needed there—now when his part was played out, Kutuzov’s place was taken by a new and necessary performer.
  • Some talked about the Moscow militia which, preceded by the clergy, would go to the Three Hills; others whispered that Augustin had been forbidden to leave, that traitors had been seized, that the peasants were rioting and robbing people on their way from Moscow, and so on.
  • In Petersburg and in the provinces at a distance from Moscow, ladies, and gentlemen in militia uniforms, wept for Russia and its ancient capital and talked of self-sacrifice and so on; but in the army which retired beyond Moscow there was little talk or thought of Moscow, and when they caught sight of its burned ruins no one swore to be avenged on the French, but they thought about their next pay, their next quarters, of Matreshka the vivandiere, and like matters.
  • If they call up the militia, you too will have to mount a horse," remarked the old count, addressing Pierre.
  • Just then Boris, with his courtierlike adroitness, stepped up to Pierre’s side near Kutuzov and in a most natural manner, without raising his voice, said to Pierre, as though continuing an interrupted conversation: "The militia have put on clean white shirts to be ready to die.
  • Evidently accustomed to managing debates and to maintaining an argument, he began in low but distinct tones: "I imagine, sir," said he, mumbling with his toothless mouth, "that we have been summoned here not to discuss whether it’s best for the empire at the present moment to adopt conscription or to call out the militia.

  • There are no more uses of "militia" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • their troops were untrained militia
  • Congress shall have power to provide for calling forth the militia

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