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War and Peace
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War and Peace
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  • It is those people I pity, and for their sake I should like to liberate the serfs.
  • Continuing to represent the liberation of the serfs as impracticable, he arranged for the erection of large buildings—schools, hospitals, and asylums—on all the estates before the master arrived.
  • On the other hand, Pierre demanded that steps should be taken to liberate the serfs, which the steward met by showing the necessity of first paying off the loans from the Land Bank, and the consequent impossibility of a speedy emancipation.
  • On one of his estates the three hundred serfs were liberated and became free agricultural laborers—this being one of the first examples of the kind in Russia.
  • Had he not established schools and hospitals and liberated his serfs?
  • Occasionally amid these memories temptations of the devil would surge into her imagination: thoughts of how things would be after his death, and how her new, liberated life would be ordered.
  • The reforming party cordially welcomed and courted him, in the first place because he was reputed to be clever and very well read, and secondly because by liberating his serfs he had obtained the reputation of being a liberal.
  • The peasants were briskly carrying out the proprietor’s goods and packing them on the carts, and Dron, liberated at Princess Mary’s wish from the cupboard where he had been confined, was standing in the yard directing the men.
  • After his liberation he reached Orel, and on the third day there, when preparing to go to Kiev, he fell ill and was laid up for three months.
  • He felt as if powers till then confined within him had been liberated, and that strange lightness did not again leave him.
  • For the representative of the Russian people, after the enemy had been destroyed and Russia had been liberated and raised to the summit of her glory, there was nothing left to do as a Russian.
  • But putting national vanity entirely aside one feels that such a conclusion involves a contradiction, since the series of French victories brought the French complete destruction, while the series of Russian defeats led to the total destruction of their enemy and the liberation of their country.
  • "There now, you wish to liberate your serfs," he continued; "that is a very good thing, but not for you—I don’t suppose you ever had anyone flogged or sent to Siberia—and still less for your serfs.

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  • She works to liberate the religious minority from persecution.
  • She is a spokesperson for women’s liberation in that country.

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