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endure
used in
War and Peace
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endure
Used in
War and Peace
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  • One had to wait and endure.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She had to endure and love, and that she did.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The sovereigns will not be able to endure this man who is a menace to everything.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He seemed carefully to cherish within himself the gloomy mood which alone enabled him to endure his position.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "Not bound to endure insults," Dolokhov concluded in loud, ringing tones.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "General, I must obey orders, but I am not bound to endure…" Dolokhov hurriedly interrupted.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • My poor husband is enduring pains and hunger in Jewish taverns, but the news which I have inspires me yet more.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • This expression suggested that she had resolved to endure her troubles uncomplainingly and that her husband was a cross laid upon her by God.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And they all struggled and suffered and tormented one another and injured their souls, their eternal souls, for the attainment of benefits which endure but for an instant.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • After the sufferings he had been enduring, Prince Andrew enjoyed a blissful feeling such as he had not experienced for a long time.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Why did I say 'Je vous aime' * to her, which was a lie, and worse than a lie? I am guilty and must endure… what? A slur on my name? A misfortune for life?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Then he was again led somewhere still blindfolded, and as they went along he was told allegories of the toils of his pilgrimage, of holy friendship, of the Eternal Architect of the universe, and of the courage with which he should endure toils and dangers.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "I will the bridge fire," he said in a solemn tone as if to announce that in spite of all the unpleasantness he had to endure he would still do the right thing.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He tried to prove to the Emperor the impossibility of levying fresh troops, spoke of the hardships already endured by the people, of the possibility of failure and so forth.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It was not that they knew that much food and fresh troops awaited them in Smolensk, nor that they were told so (on the contrary their superior officers, and Napoleon himself, knew that provisions were scarce there), but because this alone could give them strength to move on and endure their present privations.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • When he came in and saw an hussar of the line recounting his military exploits (Prince Andrew could not endure that sort of man), he gave Boris a pleasant smile, frowned as with half-closed eyes he looked at Rostov, bowed slightly and wearily, and sat down languidly on the sofa: he felt it unpleasant to have dropped in on bad company.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In burned and devastated Moscow Pierre experienced almost the extreme limits of privation a man can endure; but thanks to his physical strength and health, of which he had till then been unconscious, and thanks especially to the fact that the privations came so gradually that it was impossible to say when they began, he endured his position not only lightly but joyfully.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In burned and devastated Moscow Pierre experienced almost the extreme limits of privation a man can endure; but thanks to his physical strength and health, of which he had till then been unconscious, and thanks especially to the fact that the privations came so gradually that it was impossible to say when they began, he endured his position not only lightly but joyfully.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • If so much has been and still is written about the Berezina, on the French side this is only because at the broken bridge across that river the calamities their army had been previously enduring were suddenly concentrated at one moment into a tragic spectacle that remained in every memory, and on the Russian side merely because in Petersburg—far from the seat of war—a plan (again one of Pfuel's) had been devised to catch Napoleon in a strategic trap at the Berezina River.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • This horse that had carried the sovereign at reviews in Russia bore him also here on the field of Austerlitz, enduring the heedless blows of his left foot and pricking its ears at the sound of shots just as it had done on the Empress' Field, not understanding the significance of the firing, nor of the nearness of the Emperor Francis' black cob, nor of all that was being said, thought, and felt that day by its rider.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • For the peoples of the west to be able to make their warlike movement to Moscow it was necessary: (1) that they should form themselves into a military group of a size able to endure a collision with the warlike military group of the east, (2) that they should abandon all established traditions and customs, and (3) that during their military movement they should have at their head a man who could justify to himself and to them the deceptions, robberies, and murders which would have to…  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Understand that, understand it! I cannot endure any more," he said, and left the room.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • To endure war is the most difficult subordination of man's freedom to the law of God," the voice had said.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He at once agreed to everything, and put the matter before the Emperor," said Princess Anna Mikhaylovna enthusiastically, quite forgetting all the humiliation she had endured to gain her end.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: endure through the ages
as in: endured the pain
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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