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dragoon
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War and Peace
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dragoon
Used In
War and Peace
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  • Our infantry were stationed there, and at the farthest point the dragoons.
  • In that case the dragoons could successfully make a flank counterattack.
  • The French dragoon was a young Alsatian who spoke French with a German accent.
  • Rostov smilingly reassured the dragoon and gave him money.
  • He rode off at a walk to the right and sent an adjutant to the dragoons with orders to attack the French.
  • In the next hut there was a French colonel who had been taken prisoner by our dragoons.
  • The French dragoon officer was hopping with one foot on the ground, the other being caught in the stirrup.
  • Rostov, with his keen sportsman’s eye, was one of the first to catch sight of these blue French dragoons pursuing our Uhlans.
  • Nearer and nearer in disorderly crowds came the Uhlans and the French dragoons pursuing them.
  • The dragoons were now close at hand.
  • Nearly all the French dragoons were galloping back.
  • Three regiments have been here and spent the night, dragoons mostly.
  • But this adjutant returned half an hour later with the news that the commander of the dragoons had already retreated beyond the dip in the ground, as a heavy fire had been opened on him and he was losing men uselessly, and so had hastened to throw some sharpshooters into the wood.
  • He touched his horse, gave the word of command, and immediately, hearing behind him the tramp of the horses of his deployed squadron, rode at full trot downhill toward the dragoons.
  • With the same feeling with which he had galloped across the path of a wolf, Rostov gave rein to his Donets horse and galloped to intersect the path of the dragoons’ disordered lines.
  • Below the height on which the Kiev regiment was stationed, in the hollow where the rivulet flowed, the soul-stirring rolling and crackling of musketry was heard, and much farther to the right beyond the dragoons, the officer of the suite pointed out to Bagration a French column that was outflanking us.
  • He saw the dragoons near and that they were galloping in disorder; he knew they could not withstand an attack—knew there was only that moment and that if he let it slip it would not return.
  • He felt instinctively that if the hussars struck at the French dragoons now, the latter could not withstand them, but if a charge was to be made it must be done now, at that very moment, or it would be too late.
  • Hardly had they reached the bottom of the hill before their pace instinctively changed to a gallop, which grew faster and faster as they drew nearer to our Uhlans and the French dragoons who galloped after them.
  • A few minutes later an officer came hurriedly out of the front door, gave an order, and the dragoons formed up in line.
  • And as he spoke he saw a young man coming round the corner of the house between two dragoons.
  • It was a long time before the dragoons could extricate the bleeding youth, beaten almost to death.
  • A painstaking police officer, considering the presence of a corpse in his excellency’s courtyard unseemly, told the dragoons to take it away.
  • Two dragoons took it by its distorted legs and dragged it along the ground.
  • Who would have said that I should be a soldier and a captain of dragoons in the service of Bonaparte, as we used to call him?
  • "Draw sabers!" cried the dragoon officer, drawing his own.
  • "Saber him!" the dragoon officer almost whispered.
  • The dragoon was about to repeat his blow.
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • He saw the frightened and then infuriated face of the dragoon who dealt the blow, the look of silent, timid reproach that boy in the fur-lined coat had turned upon him.
  • One of these was running to cross the path of Count Rostopchin’s carriage, and the count himself, his coachman, and his dragoons looked with vague horror and curiosity at these released lunatics and especially at the one running toward them.
  • They swooped down close to the French dragoons, something confused happened there amid the smoke, and five minutes later our Uhlans were galloping back, not to the place they had occupied but more to the left, and among the orange-colored Uhlans on chestnut horses and behind them, in a large group, blue French dragoons on gray horses could be seen.
  • They swooped down close to the French dragoons, something confused happened there amid the smoke, and five minutes later our Uhlans were galloping back, not to the place they had occupied but more to the left, and among the orange-colored Uhlans on chestnut horses and behind them, in a large group, blue French dragoons on gray horses could be seen.
  • They are bringing another!" cried one of the officers, indicating a captive French dragoon who was being brought in on foot by two Cossacks.
  • He’ll explain". voices in the rear of the crowd were suddenly heard saying, and the general attention turned to the police superintendent’s trap which drove into the square attended by two mounted dragoons.

  • There are no more uses of "dragoon" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • He was one of the dragoons who accompanied Napoleon into Egypt.
  • In this state they set forth with the sharp rain driving in their faces: clattering at a heavy dragoon trot over the uneven town pavement, and out upon the mire-deep roads.
    Charles Dickens  --  A Tale Of Two Cities

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