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chivalry
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War and Peace
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chivalry
Used In
War and Peace
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  • They talk to us of the rules of war, of chivalry, of flags of truce, of mercy to the unfortunate and so on.
  • I saw chivalry and flags of truce in 1805; they humbugged us and we humbugged them.
  • It’s chivalry!
  • This inevitability alone can explain how the cruel Arakcheev, who tore out a grenadier’s mustache with his own hands, whose weak nerves rendered him unable to face danger, and who was neither an educated man nor a courtier, was able to maintain his powerful position with Alexander, whose own character was chivalrous, noble, and gentle.
  • Then let us imagine that the combatant who so sensibly employed the best and simplest means to attain his end was at the same time influenced by traditions of chivalry and, desiring to conceal the facts of the case, insisted that he had gained his victory with the rapier according to all the rules of art.
  • But if they did catch me they’d string me up to an aspen tree, and with all your chivalry just the same."

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  • Don Quixote was chivalrous, but delusional.
  • It struck her that it was hopeless to look for chivalry in such a man.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Room with a View

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