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stifle
in
War and Peace
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stifle
Used In
War and Peace
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  • What angered him was that the coming of these visitors revived in his mind an unsettled question he always tried to stifle, one about which he always deceived himself.
  • But it is a good thing for proprietors who perish morally, bring remorse upon themselves, stifle this remorse and grow callous, as a result of being able to inflict punishments justly and unjustly.
  • Princess Mary read the paper, and her face began to quiver with stifled sobs.
  • In the crowd people began talking loudly, to stifle their feelings of pity as it seemed to Pierre.
  • The doctors said that she could not get on without medical treatment, so they kept her in the stifling atmosphere of the town, and the Rostovs did not move to the country that summer of 1812.
  • Pierre now recognized in his friend a need with which he was only too familiar, to get excited and to have arguments about extraneous matters in order to stifle thoughts that were too oppressive and too intimate.
  • They knew their Natasha, and alarm as to what would happen if she heard this news stifled all sympathy for the man they both liked.
  • In the one case as in the other, on both sides the struggle provokes passion and stifles truth.
  • The bustle and terror of the Rostovs’ last days in Moscow stifled the gloomy thoughts that oppressed Sonya.
  • To keep one another back, to breathe in that stifling atmosphere, to be unable to stir, and to await something unknown, uncomprehended, and terrible, was becoming unbearable.
  • On his way through the streets Pierre felt stifled by the smoke which seemed to hang over the whole city.
  • Princess Mary turned to Sonya and, trying to stifle the hostile feeling that arose in her toward the girl, she kissed her.
  • In our days," continued Vera—mentioning "our days" as people of limited intelligence are fond of doing, imagining that they have discovered and appraised the peculiarities of "our days" and that human characteristics change with the times—"in our days a girl has so much freedom that the pleasure of being courted often stifles real feeling in her.
  • She was worried too about her nephew’s education for which she had always felt herself incompetent, but in the depths of her soul she felt at peace—a peace arising from consciousness of having stifled those personal dreams and hopes that had been on the point of awakening within her and were related to her meeting with Rostov.
  • "O God," she said, "how am I to stifle in my heart these temptations of the devil?

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    Show samples from other sources
  • These excessive rules that stifle creativity.
  • The authorities cracked down in an attempt to stifle dissent.

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Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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