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reproach
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War and Peace
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reproach
Used In
War and Peace
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  • Well, I don’t think you need reproach yourself on his account.
  • "Now what does this mean, gentlemen?" said the staff officer, in the reproachful tone of a man who has repeated the same thing more than once.
  • Interrupting one another, they all gave, and transmitted, orders as to how to proceed, reprimanding and reproaching him.
  • Yesterday’s adjutant reproached him for not having stayed at the palace, and offered him his own house.
  • Worn out by sleeplessness and anxiety they threw their burden of sorrow on one another and reproached and disputed with each other.
  • It was the story of a girl who had been seduced, and to whom her poor mother (sa pauvre mere) appeared, and reproached her for yielding to a man without being married.
  • In the Emperor’s suite all exchanged rapid looks that expressed dissatisfaction and reproach.
  • She looked at him inquiringly and with childlike reproach.
  • No one now loves virtue; it seems like a reproach to everyone.
  • "Andrew, why didn’t you warn me?" said the princess, with mild reproach, as she stood before her pilgrims like a hen before her chickens.
  • He spoke in the tone of entreaty and reproach that a carpenter uses to a gentleman who has picked up an ax: "We are used to it, but you, sir, will blister your hands."
  • "Yes, yes, let us go," said Rostov hastily, and lowering his eyes and shrinking, he tried to pass unnoticed between the rows of reproachful envious eyes that were fixed upon him, and went out of the room.
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • Those who were conscious raised themselves or lifted their thin yellow faces, and all looked intently at Rostov with the same expression of hope, of relief, reproach, and envy of another’s health.
  • As a young wife she was irreproachable; perhaps she could not have been so as a mother.
  • And such a state of obligatory and irreproachable idleness is the lot of a whole class—the military.
  • For a long while after he had gone, Pierre did not go to bed or order horses but paced up and down the room, pondering over his vicious past, and with a rapturous sense of beginning anew pictured to himself the blissful, irreproachable, virtuous future that seemed to him so easy.
  • The chief attraction of military service has consisted and will consist in this compulsory and irreproachable idleness.
  • He left off visiting Helene and received reproachful notes from her every day, and yet he continued to spend whole days with the Rostovs.
  • "Excuse my coming to you, cousin," she said in a reproachful and agitated voice.
  • The Emperor reproached the commanders in chief for every step they retired.
  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • Kutuzov, who was already weary of Bolkonski’s activity which seemed to reproach his own idleness, very readily let him go and gave him a mission to Barclay de Tolly.
  • But she remembered too how he had changed of late toward Mademoiselle Bourienne and could not bear to see her, thereby showing how unjust were the reproaches Princess Mary had mentally addressed to her.
  • During the first period of his service, hard as he tried and much as he reproached himself with cowardice, he had not been able to do this, but with time it had come of itself.
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel’s face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • Those who stood nearest him attended to him, unbuttoned his coat, seated him on the raised platform of the cannon, and reproached those others (whoever they might be) who had crushed him.
  • Austerlitz with the lofty heavens, his wife’s dead reproachful face, Pierre at the ferry, that girl thrilled by the beauty of the night, and that night itself and the moon, and…. all this rushed suddenly to his mind.
  • She held herself as erect, told everyone her opinion as candidly, loudly, and bluntly as ever, and her whole bearing seemed a reproach to others for any weakness, passion, or temptation—the possibility of which she did not admit.
  • He was thinking of Prince Andrew, of Natasha, and of their love, at one moment jealous of her past, then reproaching himself for that feeling.
  • Count Rostopchin was mentally preparing the angry and stinging reproaches he meant to address to Kutuzov for his deception.
  • The father and mother did not speak of the matter to their son again, but a few days later the countess sent for Sonya and, with a cruelty neither of them expected, reproached her niece for trying to catch Nicholas and for ingratitude.
  • If one accepts this twofold aim all Rostopchin’s actions appear irreproachable.
  • Lying on his bed during those sleepless nights he did just what he reproached those younger generals for doing.
  • But at the door she stopped as if her conscience reproached her for having in her joy left the child too soon, and she glanced round.
  • It would take a dozen pages to enumerate all the reproaches the historians address to him, based on their knowledge of what is good for humanity.
  • What do these reproaches mean?
  • In what does the substance of those reproaches lie?
  • The plaintive moan of reproach was drowned by the threatening and angry roar of the crowd.
  • Each one came up, glanced at what had been done, and with horror, reproach, and astonishment pushed back again.
  • He was awaiting Petya’s return in a state of agitation, anxiety, and self-reproach for having let him go.
  • * Knight without fear and without reproach.
  • But when she was with Natasha she was not vexed with her and did not reproach her.
  • He seemed in his heart to reproach her for being too perfect, and because there was nothing to reproach her with.
  • He seemed in his heart to reproach her for being too perfect, and because there was nothing to reproach her with.
  • On the contrary I continually reproach myself….
  • You reproach us women with being illogical.
  • But Princess Mary experienced a painful rather than a joyful feeling—her mental tranquillity was destroyed, and desires, doubts, self-reproach, and hopes reawoke.
  • He saw the frightened and then infuriated face of the dragoon who dealt the blow, the look of silent, timid reproach that boy in the fur-lined coat had turned upon him.
  • When Count Rostopchin at the Yauza bridge galloped up to Kutuzov with personal reproaches for having caused the destruction of Moscow, and said: "How was it you promised not to abandon Moscow without a battle?"
  • The reawakened power of life that had seized Natasha was so evidently irrepressible and unexpected by her that in her presence Princess Mary felt that she had no right to reproach her even in her heart.
  • Then all at once she remembered the tortures of suspense she had experienced for the last fortnight, and the joy that had lit up her face vanished; she frowned and overwhelmed Pierre with a torrent of reproaches and angry words.
  • Nicholas and his wife lived together so happily that even Sonya and the old countess, who felt jealous and would have liked them to disagree, could find nothing to reproach them with; but even they had their moments of antagonism.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • All he cared about was gaiety and women, and as according to his ideas there was nothing dishonorable in these tastes, and he was incapable of considering what the gratification of his tastes entailed for others, he honestly considered himself irreproachable, sincerely despised rogues and bad people, and with a tranquil conscience carried his head high.
  • But a few days before they left Moscow, moved and excited by all that was going on, she called Sonya to her and, instead of reproaching and making demands on her, tearfully implored her to sacrifice herself and repay all that the family had done for her by breaking off her engagement with Nicholas.
  • The people of the west moved eastwards to slay their fellow men, and by the law of coincidence thousands of minute causes fitted in and co-ordinated to produce that movement and war: reproaches for the nonobservance of the Continental System, the Duke of Oldenburg’s wrongs, the movement of troops into Prussia—undertaken (as it seemed to Napoleon) only for the purpose of securing an armed peace, the French Emperor’s love and habit of war coinciding with his people’s inclinations,…
  • At Krasnoe they took twenty-six thousand prisoners, several hundred cannon, and a stick called a "marshal’s staff," and disputed as to who had distinguished himself and were pleased with their achievement—though they much regretted not having taken Napoleon, or at least a marshal or a hero of some sort, and reproached one another and especially Kutuzov for having failed to do so.
  • If you were not a father there would be nothing I could reproach you with," said Anna Pavlovna, looking up pensively.
  • "Oh!" said he with reproach and surprise, "this is absurd!
  • …to the French solemnly upbraiding them for having destroyed his Orphanage; now claimed the glory of having hinted that he would burn Moscow and now repudiated the deed; now ordered the people to catch all spies and bring them to him, and now reproached them for doing so; now expelled all the French residents from Moscow, and now allowed Madame Aubert-Chalme (the center of the whole French colony in Moscow) to remain, but ordered the venerable old postmaster Klyucharev to be arrested…
  • As long as Nicholas alone was in danger the countess imagined that she loved her first-born more than all her other children and even reproached herself for it; but when her youngest: the scapegrace who had been bad at lessons, was always breaking things in the house and making himself a nuisance to everybody, that snub-nosed Petya with his merry black eyes and fresh rosy cheeks where soft down was just beginning to show—when he was thrown amid those big, dreadful, cruel men who were…
  • "Know this, Masha: I can’t reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • "Know this, Masha: I can’t reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • "Know this, Masha: I can’t reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • "Know this, Masha: I can’t reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • And do you know the new way of courting?" said Pierre with an amused smile, evidently in that cheerful mood of good humored raillery for which he so often reproached himself in his diary.
  • The first time the young foreigner allowed himself to reproach her, she lifted her beautiful head and, half turning to him, said firmly: "That’s just like a man—selfish and cruel!
  • All these acquaintances, who had so often dined and danced at his house and had so often laughed at him, now said, with a common feeling of self-reproach and emotion, as if justifying themselves: "Well, whatever he may have been he was a most worthy man.

  • There are no more uses of "reproach" in the book.


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  • She reproached him for being thoughtless and lazy.
  • Don’t reproach yourself for things beyond your control.

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