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War and Peace
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War and Peace
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  • They plunder other people’s houses, issue false paper money, and worst of all they kill my children and my father, and then talk of rules of war and magnanimity to foes!
  • The more the plundering by the French continued, the more both the wealth of Moscow and the strength of its plunderers was destroyed.
  • The few inhabitants who had remained invited commanding officers to their houses, hoping thereby to secure themselves from being plundered.
  • But the first plunderers were followed by a second and a third contingent, and with increasing numbers plundering became more and more difficult and assumed more definite forms.
  • The Russians who entered Moscow, finding it plundered, plundered it in their turn.
  • Here as at Tarutino they went after plunder, leaving the men.
  • The Russians who entered Moscow, finding it plundered, plundered it in their turn.
  • Disregarding Napoleon they rushed after the plunder and Napoleon managed to escape.
  • The longer the French remained the more these forms of town life perished, until finally all was merged into one confused, lifeless scene of plunder.
  • Within a week the peasants who came with empty carts to carry off plunder were stopped by the authorities and made to cart the corpses out of the town.
  • After staggering into Smolensk which seemed to them a promised land, the French, searching for food, killed one another, sacked their own stores, and when everything had been plundered fled farther.
  • But plundering by the Russians, with which the reoccupation of the city began, had an opposite effect: the longer it continued and the greater the number of people taking part in it the more rapidly was the wealth of the city and its regular life restored.
  • Men leave their customary pursuits, hasten from one side of Europe to the other, plunder and slaughter one another, triumph and are plunged in despair, and for some years the whole course of life is altered and presents an intensive movement which first increases and then slackens.
  • …which Nicholas had even enlarged, the same fifty horses and fifteen grooms in the stables, the same expensive presents and dinner parties to the whole district on name days; there were still the count’s games of whist and boston, at which—spreading out his cards so that everybody could see them—he let himself be plundered of hundreds of rubles every day by his neighbors, who looked upon an opportunity to play a rubber with Count Rostov as a most profitable source of income.
  • He remained in Moscow till October, letting the troops plunder the city; then, hesitating whether to leave a garrison behind him, he quitted Moscow, approached Kutuzov without joining battle, turned to the right and reached Malo-Yaroslavets, again without attempting to break through and take the road Kutuzov took, but retiring instead to Mozhaysk along the devastated Smolensk road.

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  • The conquerors plundered the town and surrounding countryside.
  • The pirates plundered small towns on that part of the coast.

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