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War and Peace
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War and Peace
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  • One of the Frenchmen, with the politeness characteristic of his countrymen, addressed the obstinately taciturn Rostov, saying that the latter had probably come to Tilsit to see the Emperor.
  • In that case we should probably have defended the Shevardino Redoubt—our left flank—still more obstinately.
  • Then if your love or passion or obstinacy—as you please—is still as great, marry!
  • He was naughty and obstinate.
  • "Mamma darling, it’s not at all so…. my poor, sweet darling," she said to her mother, who conscious that they had been on the brink of a rupture gazed at her son with terror, but in the obstinacy and excitement of the conflict could not and would not give way.
  • But Pierre did not know this; he was entirely absorbed in what lay before him, and was tortured—as those are who obstinately undertake a task that is impossible for them not because of its difficulty but because of its incompatibility with their natures—by the fear of weakening at the decisive moment and so losing his self-esteem.
  • Still less did she understand why he, kindhearted and always ready to anticipate her wishes, should become almost desperate when she brought him a petition from some peasant men or women who had appealed to her to be excused some work; why he, that kind Nicholas, should obstinately refuse her, angrily asking her not to interfere in what was not her business.
  • Bogdanich is vindictive and you’ll pay for your obstinacy," said Kirsten.
  • "No, on my word it’s not obstinacy!
  • She realized that if she said a word about his not going to the battle (she knew he enjoyed the thought of the impending engagement) he would say something about men, honor, and the fatherland—something senseless, masculine, and obstinate which there would be no contradicting, and her plans would be spoiled; and so, hoping to arrange to leave before then and take Petya with her as their protector and defender, she did not answer him, but after dinner called the count aside and implored…
  • Well, you know the count," said the adjutant cheerfully, with a smile of pride, "he flared up dreadfully—and just think of the fellow’s audacity, lying, and obstinacy!"

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  • She is an obstinate child who will not follow the family rules.
  • He is obstinate as a mule.

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