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invariably
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War and Peace
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invariably
Used In
War and Peace
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  • Though she came upon the count in his dressing gown every day, he invariably became confused and begged her to excuse his costume.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna’s broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer—all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • The period of the campaign of 1812 from the battle of Borodino to the expulsion of the French proved that the winning of a battle does not produce a conquest and is not even an invariable indication of conquest; it proved that the force which decides the fate of peoples lies not in the conquerors, nor even in armies and battles, but in something else.
  • "I know your outlook," said the Mason, "and the view of life you mention, and which you think is the result of your own mental efforts, is the one held by the majority of people, and is the invariable fruit of pride, indolence, and ignorance.

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  • I tell myself to go to sleep early, but I invariably end up watching television late into the night.
  • You better tell her we’re starting earlier. She’s invariably late.

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