To better see all uses of the word
War and Peace
please enable javascript.

Used In
War and Peace
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • The prince was silent and looked indifferent.
  • The princess went up to the door, passed by it with a dignified and indifferent air, and glanced into the little drawing room.
  • "But that is a matter of perfect indifference to me," he thought.
  • He looked up at the opening door and his expression of sleepy indifference suddenly changed to one of delighted amazement.
  • When he had finished, he turned to Bezukhov, and said in a tone of indifferent politeness: "Where are you going to now, my dear sir?"
  • When Prince Andrew left the palace he felt that all the interest and happiness the victory had afforded him had been now left in the indifferent hands of the Minister of War and the polite adjutant.
  • Prince Bagration screwed up his eyes, looked round, and, seeing the cause of the confusion, turned away with indifference, as if to say, "Is it worth while noticing trifles?"
  • Prince Andrew had gone out into the hall, and, turning his shoulders to the footman who was helping him on with his cloak, listened indifferently to his wife’s chatter with Prince Hippolyte who had also come into the hall.
  • "The step must be taken but I cannot, I cannot!" thought Pierre, and he again began speaking about indifferent matters, about Sergey Kuzmich, asking what the point of the story was as he had not heard it properly.
  • At first he heard the sound of indifferent voices, then Anna Mikhaylovna’s voice alone in a long speech, then a cry, then silence, then both voices together with glad intonations, and then footsteps.
  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?
  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.
  • The others all followed, dispirited and shamefaced, and only much later were they able to regain their former affectation of indifference.
  • She struck those who saw her by her fullness of life and beauty, combined with her indifference to everything about her.
  • Meeting at large gatherings Julie and Boris looked on one another as the only souls who understood one another in a world of indifferent people.
  • Pierre felt it strange to see this calm, indifferent crowd of people unaware of what was going on in his soul.
  • Just as in the mechanism of a clock, so in the mechanism of the military machine, an impulse once given leads to the final result; and just as indifferently quiescent till the moment when motion is transmitted to them are the parts of the mechanism which the impulse has not yet reached.
  • He entered his wife’s drawing room as one enters a theater, was acquainted with everybody, equally pleased to see everyone, and equally indifferent to them all.
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • Not only was he indifferent as to whether he got to Petersburg earlier or later, or whether he secured accommodation at this station, but compared to the thoughts that now occupied him it was a matter of indifference whether he remained there for a few hours or for the rest of his life.
  • Not only was he indifferent as to whether he got to Petersburg earlier or later, or whether he secured accommodation at this station, but compared to the thoughts that now occupied him it was a matter of indifference whether he remained there for a few hours or for the rest of his life.
  • It was as if she feared this strange, unexpected happiness of meeting again the very man she had then chosen (she was firmly convinced she had done so) and of finding him, as it seemed, not indifferent to her.
  • The conflagration, at which he had looked with so much indifference the evening before, had greatly increased during the night.
  • The only explanation was that he was indifferent, because something else, much more important, had been revealed to him.
  • Many various, indifferent, and insignificant people appeared before him.
  • He was as indifferent as heretofore to money matters, but now he felt certain of what ought and what ought not to be done.
  • In an indifferent case we recognize in it more individuality, originality, and independence.
  • Berg, oblivious of irony or indifference, continued to explain how by exchanging into the Guards he had already gained a step on his old comrades of the Cadet Corps; how in wartime the company commander might get killed and he, as senior in the company, might easily succeed to the post; how popular he was with everyone in the regiment, and how satisfied his father was with him.
  • Glancing indolently and indifferently at all the prisoners, he ordered the officer in charge to have them decently dressed and tidied up before taking them to the marshal.
  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.
  • As you know, I am quite indifferent to politics, but from my father’s remarks and his talks with Michael Ivanovich I know all that goes on in the world and especially about the honors conferred on Buonaparte, who only at Bald Hills in the whole world, it seems, is not accepted as a great man, still less as Emperor of France.
  • Pierre during the last two years, as a result of his continual absorption in abstract interests and his sincere contempt for all else, had acquired in his wife’s circle, which did not interest him, that air of unconcern, indifference, and benevolence toward all, which cannot be acquired artificially and therefore inspires involuntary respect.
  • There were still the same suffering, exhausted, and sometimes strangely indifferent faces, the same blood, the same soldiers’ overcoats, the same sounds of firing which, though distant now, still aroused terror, and besides this there were the foul air and the dust.
  • All of them—her father, mother, and Sonya—were so near to her, so familiar, so commonplace, that all their words and feelings seemed an insult to the world in which she had been living of late, and she felt not merely indifferent to them but regarded them with hostility.
  • Despite the indifference to the affairs of the world he had expressed to Pierre, he diligently followed all that went on, received many books, and to his surprise noticed that when he or his father had visitors from Petersburg, the very vortex of life, these people lagged behind himself—who never left the country—in knowledge of what was happening in home and foreign affairs.
  • Formerly she had felt that he regarded her with indifference and irony, and so had shrunk into herself as she did with others and had shown him only the combative side of her nature; but now he seemed to be trying to understand the most intimate places of her heart, and, mistrustfully at first but afterwards gratefully, she let him see the hidden, kindly sides of her character.
  • Are you here on leave?" he went on in his usual tone of indifference.
  • Set your friend’s mind at rest," said he without altering his tone, beneath the politeness and affected sympathy of which indifference and even irony could be discerned.
  • Eh, Makeev?" queried the doctor, in a tone of indifference.
  • Nicholas understood that it was all over; but he said in an indifferent tone: "Well, won’t you go on?
  • It may seem to be a matter of indifference whether we understand the meaning of historical events this way or that; yet there is the same difference between a man who says that the people of the West moved on the East because Napoleon wished it and a man who says that this happened because it had to happen, as there is between those who declared that the earth was stationary and that the planets moved round it and those who admitted that they did not know what upheld the earth, but…
  • …inopportune questions and to repeat what they had already told her many times: that so-and-so was dead and so-and-so was married, which she would again be unable to remember—yet they sat at tea round the samovar in the drawing room from habit, and Pierre answered the countess’ questions as to whether Prince Vasili had aged and whether Countess Mary Alexeevna had sent greetings and still thought of them, and other matters that interested no one and to which she herself was indifferent.
  • He declares in ze manifessto zat he cannot fiew wiz indifference ze danger vreatening Russia and zat ze safety and dignity of ze Empire as vell as ze sanctity of its alliances…." he spoke this last word with particular emphasis as if in it lay the gist of the matter.
  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.
  • Yes, she’s a good dog, gets what she’s after," answered Ilagin indifferently, of the red-spotted bitch Erza, for which, a year before, he had given a neighbor three families of house serfs.

  • There are no more uses of "indifferent" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • About a third are in favor of the change, a third are opposed, and a third are indifferent.
  • Before meeting us, she felt alone in an indifferent world.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading