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War and Peace
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War and Peace
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  • He received, however, no appointment to Kutuzov’s staff despite all Anna Mikhaylovna’s endeavors and entreaties.
  • The commander of the regiment turned to Prince Bagration, entreating him to go back as it was too dangerous to remain where they were.
  • But that one word expressed an entreaty, a threat, and above all conviction that she would herself regret her words.
  • But these words came like a piteous, despairing cry and an entreaty for pardon.
  • "My dear, really…. it’s better not to wake him…. he’s asleep," said the princess in a tone of entreaty.
  • He spoke in the tone of entreaty and reproach that a carpenter uses to a gentleman who has picked up an ax: "We are used to it, but you, sir, will blister your hands."
  • The count wished to go home, but Helene entreated him not to spoil her improvised ball, and the Rostovs stayed on.
  • "I have never yet asked you for anything and I never will again, nor have I ever reminded you of my father’s friendship for you; but now I entreat you for God’s sake to do this for my son—and I shall always regard you as a benefactor," she added hurriedly.
  • "For God’s sake, Sonya, don’t tell anyone, don’t torture me," Natasha entreated.
  • My dear friend, I entreat you, don’t philosophize, don’t doubt, marry, marry, marry….
  • Fetching water clear and sweet, Stop, dear maiden, I entreat— played "Uncle" once more, running his fingers skillfully over the strings, and then he stopped short and jerked his shoulders.
  • When after a bachelor supper he rose with his amiable and kindly smile, yielding to the entreaties of the festive company to drive off somewhere with them, shouts of delight and triumph arose among the young men.
  • Prince Andrew painfully entreated someone.
  • To fear or to try to escape that force, to address entreaties or exhortations to those who served as its tools, was useless.
  • Those eyes expressed entreaty, shame at having to ask, fear of a refusal, and readiness for relentless hatred in case of such refusal.
  • Natasha looked at her with eyes full of tears and in her look there was nothing but love and an entreaty for forgiveness.
  • His face expressed entreaty, agitation, and ecstasy.
  • Ermolov had been to see Bennigsen a few days previously and had entreated him to use his influence with the commander in chief to induce him to take the offensive.
  • The major-domo to whom these entreaties were addressed, though he was sorry for the wounded, resolutely refused, saying that he dare not even mention the matter to the count.
  • From the time he received this news to the end of the campaign all Kutuzov’s activity was directed toward restraining his troops, by authority, by guile, and by entreaty, from useless attacks, maneuvers, or encounters with the perishing enemy.
  • Not only were huge sums offered for the horses and carts, but on the previous evening and early in the morning of the first of September, orderlies and servants sent by wounded officers came to the Rostovs’ and wounded men dragged themselves there from the Rostovs’ and from neighboring houses where they were accommodated, entreating the servants to try to get them a lift out of Moscow.
  • One thing I beg, I entreat of you!" she said, touching his elbow and looking at him with eyes that shone through her tears.

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  • She flattered and entreated him until he agreed to help.
  • She was unmoved by his entreaties.

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