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used in
War and Peace
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Used in
War and Peace
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  • This was particularly noticeable on Nesvitski's usually laughing countenance.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • First came Marya Dmitrievna and the count, both with merry countenances.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He could remain silent for hours without being at all put out of countenance himself or making others uncomfortable, but as soon as the conversation concerned himself he would begin to talk circumstantially and with evident satisfaction.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The regimental commander, flushing, ran to his horse, seized the stirrup with trembling hands, threw his body across the saddle, righted himself, drew his saber, and with a happy and resolute countenance, opening his mouth awry, prepared to shout.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Despite his desperate shouts that used to seem so terrible to the soldiers, despite his furious purple countenance distorted out of all likeness to his former self, and the flourishing of his saber, the soldiers all continued to run, talking, firing into the air, and disobeying orders.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Officers who approached him with disturbed countenances became calm; soldiers and officers greeted him gaily, grew more cheerful in his presence, and were evidently anxious to display their courage before him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Balashev was only two horses' length from the equestrian with the bracelets, plumes, necklaces, and gold embroidery, who was galloping toward him with a theatrically solemn countenance, when Julner, the French colonel, whispered respectfully: "The King of Naples!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The temperature shown by the political thermometer to the company that evening was this: "Whatever the European sovereigns and commanders may do to countenance Bonaparte, and to cause me, and us in general, annoyance and mortification, our opinion of Bonaparte cannot alter.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: a pleasant countenance
as in: giving countenance
To see an overview of word senses (including some not listed above), click here.

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