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Gulliver's Travels
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Gulliver's Travels
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  • One day, in much good company, I was asked by a person of quality, "whether I had seen any of their struldbrugs, or immortals?"
  • But my choice and constant companions should be a set of my own immortal brotherhood; among whom, I would elect a dozen from the most ancient, down to my own contemporaries.
  • Otherwise, as avarice is the necessary consequence of old age, those immortals would in time become proprietors of the whole nation, and engross the civil power, which, for want of abilities to manage, must end in the ruin of the public.
  • For although few men will avow their desires of being immortal, upon such hard conditions, yet in the two kingdoms before mentioned, of Balnibarbi and Japan, he observed that every man desired to put off death some time longer, let it approach ever so late: and he rarely heard of any man who died willingly, except he were incited by the extremity of grief or torture.
  • After a short silence, the same person told me, "that his friends and mine (so he thought fit to express himself) were very much pleased with the judicious remarks I had made on the great happiness and advantages of immortal life, and they were desirous to know, in a particular manner, what scheme of living I should have formed to myself, if it had fallen to my lot to have been born a struldbrug."
  • I cried out, as in a rapture, "Happy nation, where every child hath at least a chance for being immortal!

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  • Zeus and the other gods were supposed to be immortal.
  • She believes we have an immortal soul.

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