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insolent
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Gulliver's Travels
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insolent
Used In
Gulliver's Travels
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  • They are strong and hardy, but of a cowardly spirit, and, by consequence, insolent, abject, and cruel.
  • The palace of a chief minister is a seminary to breed up others in his own trade: the pages, lackeys, and porters, by imitating their master, become ministers of state in their several districts, and learn to excel in the three principal ingredients, of insolence, lying, and bribery.
  • Nothing angered and mortified me so much as the queen’s dwarf; who being of the lowest stature that was ever in that country (for I verily think he was not full thirty feet high), became so insolent at seeing a creature so much beneath him, that he would always affect to swagger and look big as he passed by me in the queen’s antechamber, while I was standing on some table talking with the lords or ladies of the court, and he seldom failed of a smart word or two upon my littleness;

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  • I don’t recommend the hotel. The employees are insolent and unhelpful.
  • She was fired for insolence.

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