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declivity
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Gulliver's Travels
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declivity
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Gulliver's Travels
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  • The declivity was so small, that I walked near a mile before I got to the shore, which I conjectured was about eight o’clock in the evening.
  • The declivity of the upper surface, from the circumference to the centre, is the natural cause why all the dews and rains, which fall upon the island, are conveyed in small rivulets toward the middle, where they are emptied into four large basins, each of about half a mile in circuit, and two hundred yards distant from the centre.
  • …those projectors came to him with proposals to destroy this mill, and build another on the side of that mountain, on the long ridge whereof a long canal must be cut, for a repository of water, to be conveyed up by pipes and engines to supply the mill, because the wind and air upon a height agitated the water, and thereby made it fitter for motion, and because the water, descending down a declivity, would turn the mill with half the current of a river whose course is more upon a level.

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  • One Heart Breaking "There is a passion for declivity in this world," Tennessee Williams has one of his characters say in Comino Real. The ultimate declivity is death. But the pain that accompanies this descent in Williams’ plays is a sense of what is lost during the journey—honor, gentleness, tenderness, brotherhood, the ability to love, or even communicate with, another human being.
    One Heart Breaking, Time Magazine, 1/19/70  --  http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,878685,00.html(retrieved 08/15/09)
  • Physical declivity takes her from a cane to a walker to a wheelchair.

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