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contradict
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Middlemarch
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contradict
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • But there were plenty of contradictions in his imaginative demands.
  • To have approached Laure with any suit that was not reverentially tender would have been simply a contradiction of his whole feeling towards her.
  • He would never have contradicted her, and when a woman is not contradicted, she has no motive for obstinacy in her absurdities.
  • He would never have contradicted her, and when a woman is not contradicted, she has no motive for obstinacy in her absurdities.
  • And by a sad contradiction Dorothea’s ideas and resolves seemed like melting ice floating and lost in the warm flood of which they had been but another form.
  • I say, you must contradict this story.
  • Even a prospective brother-in-law may be an oppression if he will always be presupposing too good an understanding with you, and agreeing with you even when you contradict him.
  • But now, if you speak out of the Prayer-book itself, you are liable to be contradicted.
  • But I contradict it again.
  • Of course he contradicted himself twenty times over, but when you know what is likely to be true you can test a man’s admissions.
  • That is my opinion, and I am ready to maintain it against any one who contradicts me.
  • What I mean by being proof against calumny is being able to point to the fact as a contradiction.
  • Has he ever persisted in anything except from contradiction?
  • Whereupon, not being able to contradict these unpleasant facts, he contradicted his own strongest bias and said, "I am a fool."
  • Whereupon, not being able to contradict these unpleasant facts, he contradicted his own strongest bias and said, "I am a fool."
  • Celia, who had been hanging a little in the rear, came up presently, when she saw that Mr. Casaubon was gone away, and said in her easy staccato, which always seemed to contradict the suspicion of any malicious intent— "Do you know, Dorothea, I saw some one quite young coming up one of the walks."
  • He was standing two yards from her with his mind full of contradictory desires and resolves—desiring some unmistakable proof that she loved him, and yet dreading the position into which such a proof might bring him.
  • "I have contradicted it, sir," Fred answered, with a touch of impatience, not remembering that his uncle did not verbally discriminate contradicting from disproving, though no one was further from confounding the two ideas than old Featherstone, who often wondered that so many fools took his own assertions for proofs.
  • "I have contradicted it, sir," Fred answered, with a touch of impatience, not remembering that his uncle did not verbally discriminate contradicting from disproving, though no one was further from confounding the two ideas than old Featherstone, who often wondered that so many fools took his own assertions for proofs.
  • She did not like her position—alone with the old man, who seemed to show a strange flaring of nervous energy which enabled him to speak again and again without falling into his usual cough; yet she desired not to push unnecessarily the contradiction which agitated him.
  • Another time you will admit that I have some foresight; or rather you will contradict me and be just as blind as ever.
  • He made himself disagreeable—or it pleased God to make him so—and then he dared her to contradict him.
  • Will paused, imagining that it would be impossible for Dorothea to misunderstand this; indeed he felt that he was contradicting himself and offending against his self-approval in speaking to her so plainly; but still—it could not be fairly called wooing a woman to tell her that he would never woo her.
  • He had been inwardly annoyed, however, when he had asked at the Infirmary about the woman he had recommended two days before, to hear from the house-surgeon, a youngster who was not sorry to vex Minchin with impunity, exactly what had occurred: he privately pronounced that it was indecent in a general practitioner to contradict a physician’s diagnosis in that open manner, and afterwards agreed with Wrench that Lydgate was disagreeably inattentive to etiquette.
  • …him to carry out his own ideas of professional work and public benefit—he had so constantly in their personal intercourse had his pride sustained by the sense that he was making a good social use of this predominating banker, whose opinions he thought contemptible and whose motives often seemed to him an absurd mixture of contradictory impressions—that he had been creating for himself strong ideal obstacles to the proffering of any considerable request to him on his own account.
  • "Now, really, Dodo," said Celia, with rather a deeper guttural than usual, "you are contradictory: first one thing and then another.
  • You had no right to contradict my orders secretly, and treat me as if I were a fool," said Lydgate, in the same tone as before.

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  • Does the sentence contradict the main claim of the essay?
  • Does the sentence contradict what is said in the previous paragraph?

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