To see all instances of the word
premises
used in
Middlemarch
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premises
Used in
Middlemarch
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • At any rate some blood-relations should be on the premises and on the watch against those who were hardly relations at all.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She shall have her weekly allowance paid and no more: and that shall be stopped if you dare to come on to these premises again, or to come into this country after me again.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • This time Raffles declined to be "seen off the premises," as he expressed itódeclined to quit Middlemarch under Bulstrode's eyes.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Get up, sir, and do as I order you, without noise, or I will send for a policeman to take you off my premises, and you may carry your stories into every pothouse in the town, but you shall have no sixpence from me to pay your expenses there.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Seated in a famous arm-chair and in his best suit, constantly within sight of good cheer, he had a comfortable consciousness of being on the premises, mingled with fleeting suggestions of Sunday and the bar at the Green Man; and he informed Mary Garth that he should not go out of reach of his brother Peter while that poor fellow was above ground.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I've no desire to put my foot on the premises again," said Solomon.  (not reviewed by editor)

Samples from Other Sources
  • She was injured on the premises of the defendant.

  • "Then," I said, "you have been making a miscalculation, and the letter is not upon the premises, as you suppose."
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Purloined Letter

  • He refuses to do any copying; he refuses to do any thing; he says he prefers not to; and he refuses to quit the premises.
    Herman Melville  --  Bartleby, the Scrivener: a Story of Wall Street

  • They would like permission to search the premises, which means we have to vote.
    Veronica Roth  --  Insurgent
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