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despise
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Middlemarch
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despise
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • Celia thought privately, "Dorothea quite despises Sir James Chettam; I believe she would not accept him."
  • But I know you despise me.
  • "That is all the stronger reason for despising such an opposition," said Dorothea, looking at the affairs of Middlemarch by the light of the great persecutions.
  • How much, methinks, I could despise this man Were I not bound in charity against it!
  • I used to despise women a little for not shaping their lives more, and doing better things.
  • "Don’t you think men overrate the necessity for humoring everybody’s nonsense, till they get despised by the very fools they humor?" said Lydgate, moving to Mr. Farebrother’s side, and looking rather absently at the insects ranged in fine gradation, with names subscribed in exquisite writing.
  • On the contrary, he would have despised any ostentation of expense; his profession had familiarized him with all grades of poverty, and he cared much for those who suffered hardships.
  • Lydgate did not make the affair a ground for valuing himself or (very particularly) despising Minchin, such rectification of misjudgments often happening among men of equal qualifications.
  • She is not a woman to be flattered because I made myself despicable—to believe that I must be true to her because I was a dastard to you.
  • Poor Rosamond’s vagrant fancy had come back terribly scourged—meek enough to nestle under the old despised shelter.
  • "You have never felt the sort of misery I felt," said Will; "the misery of knowing that you must despise me."
  • Lydgate believed himself to be careless about his dress, and he despised a man who calculated the effects of his costume; it seemed to him only a matter of course that he had abundance of fresh garments—such things were naturally ordered in sheaves.
  • What led her particularly to desire horse-exercise was a visit from Captain Lydgate, the baronet’s third son, who, I am sorry to say, was detested by our Tertius of that name as a vapid fop "parting his hair from brow to nape in a despicable fashion" (not followed by Tertius himself), and showing an ignorant security that he knew the proper thing to say on every topic.
  • "Oh, my dear, be more thoughtful; don’t despise your neighbors so.
  • Do you not think so?" said Dorothea, rather despising herself for having a secret motive in asking the question.

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  • She despises the people he has to work for.
  • They despise each other.

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