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supposition
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Middlemarch
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supposition
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • She was beginning to be shocked that she had got to such a point of supposition, and indignant with Will for having led her to it.
  • And to me it is one of the most odious things in a girl’s life, that there must always be some supposition of falling in love coming between her and any man who is kind to her, and to whom she is grateful.
  • "I think it was you who were first hasty in your false suppositions about my feeling," said Dorothea, in the same tone.
  • For surely all must admit that a man may be puffed and belauded, envied, ridiculed, counted upon as a tool and fallen in love with, or at least selected as a future husband, and yet remain virtually unknown—known merely as a cluster of signs for his neighbors’ false suppositions.
  • His own proud reticence had prevented him from ever being undeceived in the supposition that Dorothea had originally asked her uncle to invite Will to his house.
  • Her most cheerful supposition was that her aunt Bulstrode had interfered in some way to hinder Lydgate’s visits: everything was better than a spontaneous indifference in him.
  • Lydgate felt uncomfortable under these kindly suppositions.
  • He let the kindly suppositions pass.
  • If Will Ladislaw could have overheard some of the talk at Freshitt that morning, he would have felt all his suppositions confirmed as to the readiness of certain people to sneer at his lingering in the neighborhood.
  • On the last occasion of his return from it he was observed to bring with him a new companion, a stranger to Mr. Trumbull and every one else, whose appearance, however, led to the supposition that he might be a relative of the horse-dealer’s—also "given to indulgence."
  • The actual state of his mind—his proud resolve to give the lie beforehand to any suspicion that he would play the needy adventurer seeking a rich woman—lay quite out of her imagination, and she had interpreted all his behavior easily enough by her supposition that Mr. Casaubon’s codicil seemed to him, as it did to her, a gross and cruel interdict on any active friendship between them.

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  • It is a foolish supposition.
  • She paints a vivid picture, but we must remember it is all mere supposition.

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