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paralysis
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Middlemarch
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paralysis
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • Two minutes later, when Mr. Casaubon came out of the vestry, and, entering the pew, seated himself in face of Dorothea, Will felt his paralysis more complete.
  • "No, it is not brave," said Lydgate, "but if a man is afraid of creeping paralysis?"
  • Lydgate was aware that his concessions to Rosamond were often little more than the lapse of slackening resolution, the creeping paralysis apt to seize an enthusiasm which is out of adjustment to a constant portion of our lives.
  • Lydgate sat paralyzed by opposing impulses: since no reasoning he could apply to Rosamond seemed likely to conquer her assent, he wanted to smash and grind some object on which he could at least produce an impression, or else to tell her brutally that he was master, and she must obey.

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  • She suffers paralysis of her legs.
  • Hamlet suffered near paralysis from indecision.

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