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hinder
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Middlemarch
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hinder -- as in: hindered by
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • it was to hinder Mr. Ladislaw from wanting to marry you for your money
  • I should have been travelling out of my brief to have hindered it, let Mrs. Cadwallader say what she will.
  • Brooke was really culpable; he ought to have hindered it.
  • I would not hinder Casaubon; I said so at once; for there is no knowing how anything may turn out.
  • And I think when a girl is so young as Miss Brooke is, her friends ought to interfere a little to hinder her from doing anything foolish.
  • And I should have thought—but I may be wrong—that there was no religion to hinder a man from believing the best of a young fellow, when you don’t know worse.
  • Certainly such elements in the character of a marriageable girl tended to interfere with her lot, and hinder it from being decided according to custom, by good looks, vanity, and merely canine affection.
  • "If you mean to hinder everybody from having money but saints and evangelists, you must give up some profitable partnerships, that’s all I can say," Mr. Vincy burst out very bluntly.
  • "I had a duty towards him," said Mr. Casaubon, laying his other hand on Dorothea’s in conscientious acceptance of her caress, but with a glance which he could not hinder from being uneasy.
  • Nothing could hinder it but her love of extremes, and her insistence on regulating life according to notions which might cause a wary man to hesitate before he made her an offer, or even might lead her at last to refuse all offers.
  • When she made remarks to this edifying effect, she had a firm little frown on her brow, which yet did not hinder her face from looking benevolent, and her words which came forth like a procession were uttered in a fervid agreeable contralto.
  • Mr. Casaubon had taken a cruelly effective means of hindering her: even with indignation against him in her heart, any act that seemed a triumphant eluding of his purpose revolted her.
  • If Cadwallader—if every one else had regarded the affair as he, Sir James, had done, the marriage might have been hindered.
  • This was not what he had intended; but other schemes would not be hindered: they would simply adjust themselves anew.
  • "Oh, very well; this confounded rain has hindered me from sketching," said Will, feeling so happy that he affected indifference with delightful ease.
  • A letter addressed to the Poste Restante in Paris within the fortnight would hinder him, if necessary, from arriving at an inconvenient moment.
  • Sir James Chettam could not look with any satisfaction on Mr. Brooke’s new courses; but it was easier to object than to hinder.
  • Fred says frankly he is not fit for a clergyman, and I would do anything I could to hinder a man from the fatal step of choosing the wrong profession.
  • I utterly distrust his morals, and it is my duty to hinder to the utmost the fulfilment of his designs.
  • You cannot say that I have ever tried to hinder you from working.
  • As to gossip, you know, sending him away won’t hinder gossip.
  • Well, it would have been worse if he had made the codicil to hinder her from marrying again at all, you know.
  • What’s to hinder ’cause from cutting right and left if they begin?
  • Now, my lads, you can’t hinder the railroad: it will be made whether you like it or not.
  • I can hinder nothing.
  • That I will hinder!
  • "I wish to God we could hinder Dorothea from knowing this," said Sir James Chettam, with a little frown on his brow, and an expression of intense disgust about his mouth.
  • Her most cheerful supposition was that her aunt Bulstrode had interfered in some way to hinder Lydgate’s visits: everything was better than a spontaneous indifference in him.
  • In the earlier half of the day there was business to hinder any formal communication of an adverse resolve; in the later there was dinner, wine, whist, and general satisfaction.
  • One day that she had an opportunity she could not resist describing the kitchen scene to Fred, who would not be hindered from immediately going to see it, affecting simply to pass through.
  • —it hinders profane language, and attaches a man to the society of refined females.
  • He lets you have your plans, only he hinders you from being taken in.
  • Another mile would bring them to Stone Court, and at the end of the first half, the house was already visible, looking as if it had been arrested in its growth toward a stone mansion by an unexpected budding of farm-buildings on its left flank, which had hindered it from becoming anything more than the substantial dwelling of a gentleman farmer.
  • But the consequence is, that the whole profession in Middlemarch have set themselves tooth and nail against the Hospital, and not only refuse to cooperate themselves, but try to blacken the whole affair and hinder subscriptions.
  • Mr. Garth told me what happened on the night of Featherstone’s death—how you refused to burn the will; and he said that you had some heart-prickings on that subject, because you had been the innocent means of hindering Fred from getting his ten thousand pounds.
  • It is wicked to let people think evil of any one falsely, when it can be hindered.
  • Suppose it had been me and little Arthur, and Dodo had been hindered from coming to see me!
  • She said hurriedly, "I am so glad," and then bent over her writing to hinder any one from noticing her face.
  • Bowyer couldn’t afford it, and only wanted to hinder every other man from making a figure.
  • She immediately walked out of the room in silence, but with an intense determination to hinder what Lydgate liked to do.
  • If there’s a chance of his going to the dogs, let him—perhaps you could nohow hinder it—and do you take the benefit.’
  • How could he hinder her, how betray his terror by opening the door to detect her?
  • He did not hinder her from going to her father early in the morning—it seemed now that he ought not to hinder her from doing as she pleased.
  • He did not hinder her from going to her father early in the morning—it seemed now that he ought not to hinder her from doing as she pleased.
  • And, Chettam, it will annoy you uncommonly—but, you see, you have not been able to hinder it, any more than I have.
  • You did nothing to hinder it.
  • On the contrary, he felt a cold certainty at his heart that Raffles—unless providence sent death to hinder him—would come back to Middlemarch before long.
  • She had a good deal of disdain for Mrs. Vincy’s evident alarm lest she and Fred should be alone together, but it did not hinder her from thinking anxiously of the way in which Fred would be affected, if it should turn out that his uncle had left him as poor as ever.
  • She looked as if there were a spell upon her, keeping her motionless and hindering her from unclasping her hands, while some intense, grave yearning was imprisoned within her eyes.
  • Still, if I believe that I can set going a better method of treatment—if I believe that I can pursue certain observations and inquiries which may be a lasting benefit to medical practice, I should be a base truckler if I allowed any consideration of personal comfort to hinder me.
  • The duteous merciful constancy of his wife had delivered him from one dread, but it could not hinder her presence from being still a tribunal before which he shrank from confession and desired advocacy.
  • His mind also was tumultuously busy while he watched her, and he was feeling rather wildly that something must happen to hinder their parting—some miracle, clearly nothing in their own deliberate speech.
  • Although her duplicity in the affair of the house had exceeded what he knew, and had really hindered the Plymdales from knowing of it, she had no consciousness that her action could rightly be called false.
  • Bulstrode was at home to receive him, and hinder his communication with the rest of the family, but he could not altogether hinder the circumstances of the visit from compromising himself and alarming his wife.
  • Bulstrode was at home to receive him, and hinder his communication with the rest of the family, but he could not altogether hinder the circumstances of the visit from compromising himself and alarming his wife.
  • She trusted to the chance that nothing more would pass between her husband and the auctioneer until some issue should have justified her interference; at any rate, she had hindered the event which she immediately dreaded.
  • It is enough for me to point out to yourself that there are certain social fitnesses and proprieties which should hinder a somewhat near relative of mine from becoming any wise conspicuous in this vicinity in a status not only much beneath my own, but associated at best with the sciolism of literary or political adventurers.
  • But now it occurred to her that they should be put out of her husband’s sight: whatever might have been the sources of his annoyance about them, he must, if possible, not be annoyed again; and she ran her eyes first over the letter addressed to him to assure herself whether or not it would be necessary to write in order to hinder the offensive visit.
  • But, my dear Rosamond, as a question of pride, which I feel just as much as you can, it is surely better to manage the thing ourselves, and let the servants see as little of it as possible; and since you are my wife, there is no hindering your share in my disgraces—if there were disgraces.
  • But the mixture of anger in her agitation had vanished at the sight of him; she had been used, when they were face to face, always to feel confidence and the happy freedom which comes with mutual understanding, and how could other people’s words hinder that effect on a sudden?
  • Also, the high standard held up to the public mind by the College of which which gave its peculiar sanction to the expensive and highly rarefied medical instruction obtained by graduates of Oxford and Cambridge, did not hinder quackery from having an excellent time of it; for since professional practice chiefly consisted in giving a great many drugs, the public inferred that it might be better off with more drugs still, if they could only be got cheaply, and hence swallowed large cubic…
  • No ideas or opinions could hinder him from seeing the one probability to be, that Raffles recovered would be just the same man as before, with his strength as a tormentor renewed, obliging him to drag away his wife to spend her years apart from her friends and native place, carrying an alienating suspicion against him in her heart.
  • He had himself ridden to Lowick village that he might look at the register and talk over the whole matter with Mr. Farebrother, who was not more surprised than the lawyer that an ugly secret should have come to light about Bulstrode, though he had always had justice enough in him to hinder his antipathy from turning into conclusions.
  • Though, in deference to her masculine advisers, she had refrained from what Sir James had called "interfering in this Bulstrode business," the hardship of Lydgate’s position was continually in her mind, and when Bulstrode applied to her again about the hospital, she felt that the opportunity was come to her which she had been hindered from hastening.
  • This was not the first time that Mr. Farebrother had heard hints of Lydgate’s expenses being obviously too great to be met by his practice, but he thought it not unlikely that there were resources or expectations which excused the large outlay at the time of Lydgate’s marriage, and which might hinder any bad consequences from the disappointment in his practice.
  • (What Mr. Vincy thought confusedly was, that the fever might somehow have been hindered if Wrench had shown the proper solicitude about his—the Mayor’s—family.
  • And she wrote what she considered the most judicious letter possible—one which would strike Sir Godwin as a proof of her excellent sense—pointing out how desirable it was that Tertius should quit such a place as Middlemarch for one more fitted to his talents, how the unpleasant character of the inhabitants had hindered his professional success, and how in consequence he was in money difficulties, from which it would require a thousand pounds thoroughly to extricate him.
  • He continually deferred the final steps; in the midst of his fears, like many a man who is in danger of shipwreck or of being dashed from his carriage by runaway horses, he had a clinging impression that something would happen to hinder the worst, and that to spoil his life by a late transplantation might be over-hasty—especially since it was difficult to account satisfactorily to his wife for the project of their indefinite exile from the only place where she would like to live.
  • "But—deuce take it—this is what comes of men being fools—I’m hindered of my day’s work.
  • "I think it is one’s function as a medical man to hinder regrets of that sort as far as possible.
  • "I call it improper pride to let fools’ notions hinder you from doing a good action.
  • "Nonsense!" argued Inclination, "it would be too monstrous for him to hinder me from going out to a pretty country church on a spring morning.
  • I must go and hinder him from jarring all your nerves," said Rosamond, moving to the other side of the room, where Fred having opened the piano, at his father’s desire, that Rosamond might give them some music, was parenthetically performing "Cherry Ripe!" with one hand.
  • "I can do nothing to hinder it, Cadwallader," he added, turning for a little countenance toward the Rector, who said— "—I—should not make any fuss about it.
  • He could say that to me, because he knows that I had much trial in my marriage, from my husband’s illness, which hindered his plans and saddened him; and he knows that I have felt how hard it is to walk always in fear of hurting another who is tied to us."

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    Show samples from other sources
  • Her efforts to turn the department around were further hindered by budgetary cuts.
  • The brace I have to wear is hindering my movements

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