To better see all uses of the word
yoke
in
Middlemarch
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
yoke -- as in: the yoke of bondage
Used In
Middlemarch
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • The younger had always worn a yoke; but is there any yoked creature without its private opinions?
  • The younger had always worn a yoke; but is there any yoked creature without its private opinions?
  • But he felt his neck under Bulstrode’s yoke; and though he usually enjoyed kicking, he was anxious to refrain from that relief.
  • Either you slip out of service altogether, and become good for nothing, or you wear the harness and draw a good deal where your yoke-fellows pull you.
  • In her present matronly age at least, Mrs. Garth never committed herself by over-hasty speech; having, as she said, borne the yoke in her youth, and learned self-control.
  • His was one of the natures in which conscience gets the more active when the yoke of life ceases to gall them.
  • Neither law nor the world’s opinion compelled her to this—only her husband’s nature and her own compassion, only the ideal and not the real yoke of marriage.
  • Dorothea was not taken by surprise: many incidents had been leading her to the conjecture of some intention on her husband’s part which might make a new yoke for her.
  • Lydgate was bowing his neck under the yoke like a creature who had talons, but who had Reason too, which often reduces us to meekness.
  • Poor Lydgate! the "if Rosamond will not mind," which had fallen from him involuntarily as part of his thought, was a significant mark of the yoke he bore.
  • It was because Lydgate writhed under the idea of getting his neck beneath this vile yoke that he had fallen into a bitter moody state which was continually widening Rosamond’s alienation from him.
  • Under the first galling pressure of foreseen difficulties, and the first perception that his marriage, if it were not to be a yoked loneliness, must be a state of effort to go on loving without too much care about being loved, he had once or twice tried a dose of opium.

  • There are no more uses of "yoke" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • They threw off the yoke of slavery.
  • under the yoke of a tyrant

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading