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whim
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Middlemarch
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whim
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Middlemarch
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  • A young lady of some birth and fortune, who knelt suddenly down on a brick floor by the side of a sick laborer and prayed fervidly as if she thought herself living in the time of the Apostles—who had strange whims of fasting like a Papist, and of sitting up at night to read old theological books!
  • As to freaks like this of Miss Brooke’s, Mrs. Cadwallader had no patience with them, and now saw that her opinion of this girl had been infected with some of her husband’s weak charitableness: those Methodistical whims, that air of being more religious than the rector and curate together, came from a deeper and more constitutional disease than she had been willing to believe.
  • ) "The fact is, it’s about a whim of old Featherstone’s.

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  • They flew to Paris on a whim.
  • This is the devilish thing about foreign affairs: they are foreign and will not always conform to our whim.
    James Reston

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