To see all instances of the word
waive
used in
Middlemarch
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waive
Used in
Middlemarch
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • "Yes," said Will, in a tone that seemed to waive the subject as uninteresting.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "Thank you," said Caleb, making a slight gesture with his right hand to waive the invitation.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • With this feeling uppermost, he continued to waive the question of the chaplaincy, and to persuade himself that it was not only no proper business of his, but likely enough never to vex him with a demand for his vote.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Young Ladislaw did not pay that visit to which Mr. Brooke had invited him, and only six days afterwards Mr. Casaubon mentioned that his young relative had started for the Continent, seeming by this cold vagueness to waive inquiry.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There are answers which, in turning away wrath, only send it to the other end of the room, and to have a discussion coolly waived when you feel that justice is all on your own side is even more exasperating in marriage than in philosophy.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But going out of the porte cochere he met Mr. Casaubon, and that gentleman, expressing the best wishes for his cousin, politely waived the pleasure of any further leave-taking on the morrow, which would be sufficiently crowded with the preparations for departure.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She folded herself in the large chair, and leaned her head against it in fatigued quiescence, while Tantripp went away wondering at this strange contrariness in her young mistress—that just the morning when she had more of a widow's face than ever, she should have asked for her lighter mourning which she had waived before.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Nothing escaped Lydgate in Rosamond's graceful behavior: how delicately she waived the notice which the old man's want of taste had thrust upon her by a quiet gravity, not showing her dimples on the wrong occasion, but showing them afterwards in speaking to Mary, to whom she addressed herself with so much good-natured interest, that Lydgate, after quickly examining Mary more fully than he had done before, saw an adorable kindness in Rosamond's eyes.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: waive the right
as in: waive the player
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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