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somber
in
Middlemarch
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somber
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • The grounds here were more confined, the flower-beds showed no very careful tendance, and large clumps of trees, chiefly of sombre yews, had risen high, not ten yards from the windows.
  • "You will not mind this sombre light," said Dorothea, standing in the middle of the room.
  • The light was more and more sombre, but there came a flash of lightning which made them start and look at each other, and then smile.
  • It was a lovely afternoon; the leaves from the lofty limes were falling silently across the sombre evergreens, while the lights and shadows slept side by side: there was no sound but the cawing of the rooks, which to the accustomed ear is a lullaby, or that last solemn lullaby, a dirge.
  • The day passed in a sombre fashion, not unusual, though Mr. Casaubon was perhaps unusually silent; but there were hours of the night which might be counted on as opportunities of conversation; for Dorothea, when aware of her husband’s sleeplessness, had established a habit of rising, lighting a candle, and reading him to sleep again.

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  • Before she said anything, I knew it was bad news from her somber face.
  • She wore a somber black dress to the funeral.

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